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Are you a real estate dinosaur?

By
Real Estate Broker/Owner with Real Living GreatWest

A common occurrence in our business and every walk of life is to see a sales person who has stopped growing. We stop growing physically as we finish  up our teen years, but we should never stop growing in the other important areas of our lives.

 

In our business we frequently see what people call "burn-out" or "maxed-out" and the sales person willingly becomes a real estate dinosaur. This is the point in a sales person life that he/she somehow feels they know enough to coast for the rest of their career. This is not something that only happens in our business. This happens in all fields: teaching, medicine government, etc. For one reason or another, perhaps for a combination of reasons, the person affected stops learning and tries to bluff their way through the rest of their career. The problem is, in today's constantly changing business, the bluff doesn't last very long. It used to last longer than it does today, but it never worked well. When others are moving forward it's easy to see when someone falls behind the curve.

 

From this point on there's nothing new or exciting coming out of them. They become negative and more concerned about leaving the office on time and having big weekends and vacations. The business becomes more of a job, a chore that is more of a means to an end, a burden necessary in order to get an occasional check.

 

At first they become indignant about seeing other people, perhaps younger people, being recognized for their efforts and production. But soon it just gives them one more reason for doing no more than they have to, making no effort to improve or update their business practices. After all, now they can tell themselves that the company doesn't appreciate them and give them more leads.

 

Every morning lots of real estate dinosaurs commute to work and back home again, putting in their time, doing what little has to be done. They do not read the latest books or other listen to audio programs that might help them. They no longer look to implement good ideas. They just make their appearance sometime in the day and disappear without leaving a trace. Somewhere along the line they just lost interest. All of the excitement and fun went out out of their business, and, as a rule, out of their life.

 

Real estate dinosaurs come in all ages and in both sexes. But the best professionals either never lose their zest and enthusiasm or somehow they work to regain it, and it stays with them for the rest of their careers and their lives.

 

Look in the mirror today. Is there a dinosaur looking back at you?

 

Don't forget the webinar Friday, "How to have a successful open house."

 

A common occurrence in our business and every walk of life is to see a sales person who has stopped growing. We stop growing physically as we finish  up our teen years, but we should never stop growing in the other important areas of our lives.

 

In our business we frequently see what people call "burn-out" or "maxed-out" and the sales person willingly becomes a real estate dinosaur. This is the point in a sales person life that he/she somehow feels they know enough to coast for the rest of their career. This is not something that only happens in our business. This happens in all fields: teaching, medicine government, etc. For one reason or another, perhaps for a combination of reasons, the person affected stops learning and tries to bluff their way through the rest of their career. The problem is, in today's constantly changing business, the bluff doesn't last very long. It used to last longer than it does today, but it never worked well. When others are moving forward it's easy to see when someone falls behind the curve.

 

From this point on there's nothing new or exciting coming out of them. They become negative and more concerned about leaving the office on time and having big weekends and vacations. The business becomes more of a job, a chore that is more of a means to an end, a burden necessary in order to get an occasional check.

 

At first they become indignant about seeing other people, perhaps younger people, being recognized for their efforts and production. But soon it just gives them one more reason for doing no more than they have to, making no effort to improve or update their business practices. After all, now they can tell themselves that the company doesn't appreciate them and give them more leads.

 

Every morning lots of real estate dinosaurs commute to work and back home again, putting in their time, doing what little has to be done. They do not read the latest books or other listen to audio programs that might help them. They no longer look to implement good ideas. They just make their appearance sometime in the day and disappear without leaving a trace. Somewhere along the line they just lost interest. All of the excitement and fun went out out of their business, and, as a rule, out of their life.

 

Real estate dinosaurs come in all ages and in both sexes. But the best professionals either never lose their zest and enthusiasm or somehow they work to regain it, and it stays with them for the rest of their careers and their lives.

 

Look in the mirror today. Is there a dinosaur looking back at you?

Don't forget the webinar Friday, "How to have a successful open house."

Thought for today: To not have goals and objectives is to miss a great deal of living.

Have a productive day!

GreatWest GMAC

If you have any questions please contact Brodie Stephens or Sami Siddiqui at

www.localhomelink.com

 

Source Bill Fields Learning Systems

 

 

Comments (2)

Jeana Cowie
RE/MAX Real Estate Limited - Paramus, NJ
Broker Associate, ABR, CRS, GRI, SRES

 

I have 16 years of full time real estate experience and could eaily allow myself to be a "real estate dinosaur". However, I would NEVER let that happen. I have recently acquired my Broker's license, GRI, ABR & SRES designations. I go to seminars, etc. I know that there is so much out there we can learn from. It is important thet we grow professionally & personally. There is always room to improve in my opinion.

Jeana Cowie, Re/Max Real Estate Ltd., Bergen County, NJ

  

 

Sep 23, 2009 12:18 PM
Sami T. Siddiqui
Real Living GreatWest - Sacramento, CA

I agree that one can never learn enough or grow more within their profession. 

Check out our new site www.localhomelink.com and you may also want to drop in and listen to our new pod cast at www.housetalkonline.com

Have a great day!

Brodie Stephens

GreatWest GMAC

Sep 30, 2009 05:47 AM