Dept of Energy Recommends Use of Infrared Home Inspections

By
Home Inspector with HomeSafe Inspection
Publication from the DOE says thermographic scans by trained technicians are usually accurate enough to hold up in court.

The U.S. Department of Energy has issued a publication advising home buyers to get an infrared (thermographic) inspection before making a final purchasing decision.  The recommendation appears in the online version of DOE publication, "A Consumer's Guide to Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy" (EERE).  The publication outlines the benefits of infrared scanning of a house to detect problems with energy efficiency.  IT goes on to state, "In addition to using thermography during an energy audit, you should have a scan done before purchasing a house; even new houses can have defects in their thermal envelopes."  "You may wish to include a clause in the contract requiring a thermographic scan of the house," the publication adds.  "A thermographic scan performed by a certified technician is usually accurate enough to use as documentation in court proceedings." 

To read the publication, visit www.eere.energy.gov.  Enter the keyword "thermography" in the Search/Help box on the upper right-hand side of the screen. 

HomeSafe Inspection pioneered the use of infrared technology in home inspections and pest control inspections.  HomeSafe's high-powered, customized IR technology, combined with acoustic (listening) sensors, empower inspectors to, in effect, "see" and "hear" through a house's walls, floors and ceilings, uncovering hidden problems that may go undetected in an ordinary visual inspection.  HomeSafe has also made the technology affordable through its franchise and lease/licensing program for home inspectors and pest control operators. 

For more information on HomeSafe Inspection's advanced technology visit our blog at http://alabamahomesafe.wordpress.com or call 877-769-9991.

Comments (2)

Tim Howe
Residential Quality Analysis LLC - Montgomery, AL

Phillip,

HomeSafe's high-powered, customized IR technology, combined with acoustic (listening) sensors, empower inspectors to, in effect, "see" and "hear" through a house's walls, floors and ceilings, uncovering hidden problems that may go undetected in an ordinary visual inspection. 

Surely you know that this is misleading and inaccurate. IR cameras do no such thing as 'effectivly seeing through a  house's walls, floors and ceilings, uncovering hidden problems that may go undetected in an ordinary visual inspection. 

They 'read' differential reflected surface temperature and display the differntials visually. Not even close to seeing through walls. Not even close.

Publication from the DOE says thermographic scans by trained technicians are usually accurate enough to hold up in court.

Unless you are an ASNT level III thermographer (and you may well be), you are not qualified to write procedures (and you had better have a written procedure if you go to court) or interpret results. Go to court with a week or less of training and no supervised experience, and you will lose. Every time. A week long training course qualifies no one to work independently as an NDT technician. I have 20 years experience as an NDT engineer and have held multiple level III designations. I am not guessing about this. A level I (or less, as is the case with most HI's using these devices) designation, will rightfully get you laughed out of court as a neophyte trainee.

Tim

Jun 22, 2007 03:13 PM
Dale Baker
Baker Energy Audits and Commercial Properties Inspections - Claremont, NH
New Hampshire Relocation Real Estate Information

Howdy Philip

Thank you for a good reading post with some good info.

Have a good one

Oct 05, 2007 11:29 AM