Housing News Updated & Evaluated

By
Real Estate Agent with Port Washington Properties

The most recent housing report showed that sales for October 2009 were up 10.1% over October 2008. While that is certainly promising news, it must be considered in light of a few factors. The first factor was, of course, that October 2008 numbers were so dismal that even with an increase, there is plenty of room for improvement. Then, we must remember that some closings last month occurred as a result of the First Time Housing Credit, and the uncertainty at that time over whether it would be extended (remember it was originally set to expire at end of November). The continuation of historically low mortgage rates has certainly also helped. In addition, while sales were up, the average price of a house sold last month versus a year before is down, so, in other words, houses are still selling for less than in the past.
The good news are indications are that the worst of the recession is probably past us, consumer confidence seems to have improved slightly, mortgage rates should remain low for the foreseeable future (and hopefully the government will apply pressures on lenders to lend!), home prices are more affordable, the Home buying credit has been BOTH extend and enhanced, and most economists are calling for the U.S. economy to improve somewhat throughout 2010. The less-happy news is the high joblessness rate, the uncertainty in the economy, less than stellar public consumer confidence, and a seemingly prevailing attitude that "there is no rush" to do anything, and the overall wait-and-see attitude.
We have gone from a decade of a "seller's market" in the housing market, to a mixed market, to a buyer's market (where unfortunately NOT enough buyers are taking advantage - - - either being unwilling, afraid, or unable to).  The real estate market has always been cyclical, and this market is the same in that way. We are probably at or near the bottom of the market now, and 2010 should probably see the beginning of the recovery. Those in a position to take advantage should do so now, because the combination of tax advantages, low prices and low mortgage rates have brought the true cost of home purchasing down significantly.
The industry and those interested in having a sound and robust housing market should implore their elected officials to address the most pressing economic issues now --- joblessness (and job creation), consumer confidence, responsible economic policies, and continued incentives that benefits consumers instead of just large corporations!

FOLLOW ME ON TWITTER: @rgbrody (www.twitter.com/rgbrody
CHECK OUT MY REAL ESTATE SITE: http://tinyurl.com/pwlire
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The most recent housing report showed that sales for October 2009 were up 10.1% over October 2008. While that is certainly promising news, it must be considered in light of a few factors. The first factor was, of course, that October 2008 numbers were so dismal that even with an increase, there is plenty of room for improvement. Then, we must remember that some closings last month occurred as a result of the First Time Housing Credit, and the uncertainty at that time over whether it would be extended (remember it was originally set to expire at end of November). The continuation of historically low mortgage rates has certainly also helped. In addition, while sales were up, the average price of a house sold last month versus a year before is down, so, in other words, houses are still selling for less than in the past.
The good news are indications are that the worst of the recession is probably past us, consumer confidence seems to have improved slightly, mortgage rates should remain low for the foreseeable future (and hopefully the government will apply pressures on lenders to lend!), home prices are more affordable, the Home buying credit has been BOTH extend and enhanced, and most economists are calling for the U.S. economy to improve somewhat throughout 2010. The less-happy news is the high joblessness rate, the uncertainty in the economy, less than stellar public consumer confidence, and a seemingly prevailing attitude that "there is no rush" to do anything, and the overall wait-and-see attitude.
We have gone from a decade of a "seller's market" in the housing market, to a mixed market, to a buyer's market (where unfortunately NOT enough buyers are taking advantage - - - either being unwilling, afraid, or unable to).  The real estate market has always been cyclical, and this market is the same in that way. We are probably at or near the bottom of the market now, and 2010 should probably see the beginning of the recovery. Those in a position to take advantage should do so now, because the combination of tax advantages, low prices and low mortgage rates have brought the true cost of home purchasing down significantly.
The industry and those interested in having a sound and robust housing market should implore their elected officials to address the most pressing economic issues now --- joblessness (and job creation), consumer confidence, responsible economic policies, and continued incentives that benefits consumers instead of just large corporations!

FOLLOW ME ON TWITTER: @rgbrody (www.twitter.com/rgbrody
CHECK OUT MY REAL ESTATE SITE: http://tinyurl.com/pwlire
LEARN WHAT A CONSULTING PRO CAN DO FOR YOU: http://tinyurl.com/rgbcons
FOLLOW MY BLOG UPDATES (updated several times each week):
                                            
http://tinyurl.com/rgbstake

Comments (2)

Li Read
Sea to Sky Premier Properties (Salt Spring) - Salt Spring Island, BC
Caring expertise...knowledge for you!

Thoughtful post...thanks for sharing your perspective.

Nov 24, 2009 02:37 AM
Charlie Gantz
Keller Williams Commercial, Tampa Bay - Saint Petersburg, FL
J.D., M.B.A.

Richard, I'm sure the elected officials that you mention are doing everything they can do to encourage out of state businesses to move to their respective states.  After all state and congressional elections are a year away which doesn't give much time to effect a change in the economic situation of a state.  If they haven't already put the ball into play they won't easily get it done.  Charlie Gantz, Greenwood, IN; J.D., M.B.A.; Owner/Principal Broker, Atlas Commercial Real Estate, LLC

Nov 24, 2009 02:42 AM