Are we Ready for a Hurricane?

By
Real Estate Agent with Equity Realty- TVG

The Atlantic hurricane season could be the busiest since 2005, when Katrina and Rita caused massive destruction along the same part of the Gulf Coast now struggling with the largest offshore oil spill in U.S. history, government scientists said Thursday.The 2010 season may spawn as many as 23 named tropical storms, including up to seven major hurricanes, a number not likely to be affected by the spill, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration predicted.

Eight to 14 storms would strengthen into hurricanes, with top winds of 74 mph or higher, the agency said. Three to seven of those could become major storms that reach Category 3 or higher - meaning they bring sustained winds of at least 111 mph.

A hurricane might help break up the oil spill staining the Gulf of Mexico, but the oil won't affect significantly how tropical storms develop, forecasters said. They don't know what kind of environmental hazards to expect, though there are fears that winds and waves could push the oil deeper into estuaries and wetlands.

Government scientists said Thursday that anywhere from 500,000 gallons to a million gallons a day has been leaking from the site where an oil rig exploded April 20, killing 11 people. BP PLC, which leased the rig and is responsible for the cleanup, and the Coast Guard previously had estimated the flow was about 210,000 gallons per day.

The expanding slick already has coated wildlife and marshes in Louisiana, but Lubchenco said the spill is still small relative to hurricanes - which sometimes span the entire Gulf.

Although some oil could be pushed inland by a storm as it makes landfall, it could be difficult to determine whether it leaked from flooded cars or factories, Federal Emergency Management Agency chief Craig Fugate said.

Three hurricanes developed out of nine tropical storms in 2009. None of the hurricanes came ashore in the United States. Hurricane Ida hit Nicaragua as a Category 1 storm in November.

National Hurricane Center Director Bill Read said Wednesday that his biggest concern for the season is a storm striking Haiti, where hundreds of thousands of people have been living in makeshift camps since the Jan. 12 earthquake. Heavy rains can trigger serious flooding and mudslides in the mountainous Caribbean country, but no evacuation plans exist for displaced communities.

Tropical storms are named when their sustained winds reach 39 mph. The first named storm of the 2010 season will be Alex.

In April, Colorado State University researchers predicted 15 named storms would form this season, with four developing into major hurricanes.

Are we ready for Hurricane season?

Posted by

                       

                                                           

Jesse Vasquez

Team Vasquez Realty Group LLC

Graduate of Realtors Institute

801-440-3100 Cell

888-418-8889- Toll Free

407-706-5233  Efax

jesse@teamvasquez.net

www.mynewtampahomes.com

www.jessevasquez.net

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Comments (2)

Amy Law
Alliance Properties - Crosby, TX

OH, man. I grew up on Galveston Bay. The height of Hurricane Season is always worrisome for me. I think Harris and Galveston County is as ready as can be. I was driving along the coast today, and am completely amaized and proud of how quickly we have recovered from Ike. We sure do not need another storm though. Good post.

May 28, 2010 12:56 PM
Catherine Chaudemanche - Edison & Central NJ
Metuchen Keller Williams Elite Realty / Middlesex County, NJ - Edison, NJ
Full Time, Informed and Involved- Results Driven

Hi Jesse,

Just stopping by to see how is everything with you...I have been extremely busy this summer and did not have much time to allocate to ActiveRain as I wish I would...Hope everything is fine.

Cathy Chaudemanche

Aug 24, 2010 09:47 AM