Economy adds 431K jobs

By
Real Estate Agent with Palatium Auction and Appraisal Service, Real Estate Auctions, Estate, Moving, Downsizing Auctions 618-233-1000 USPAP Appraisals proesch@ptauctions.net

Job creation by private companies grew at the slowest pace since the start of the year, as a wave of census hiring lifted payrolls by 431,000 in May. The unemployment rate dipped to 9.7 percent as people gave up searching for work.

The Labor Department's new employment snapshot released Friday suggested that outside of the burst of hiring of temporary census workers by the federal government many private employers are wary of bulking up their work forces.

That indicates the economic recovery may not bring relief fast enough for millions of Americans who are unemployed.

Virtually all the job creation in May came from the hiring of 411,000 census workers. Such hiring peaked in May and will begin tailing off in June.

By contrast, hiring by private employers, the backbone of the economy, slowed sharply. They added just 41,000 jobs, down from 218,000 in April and the fewest since January.

"Although the economic outlook is improving, the recovery is still pretty tepid," said Paul Ashworth, senior U.S. economist at Capital Economics.

President Barack Obama acknowledged that temporary census jobs drove the overall payroll gain. But he said private sector hiring is growing. He noted five straight months of job gains after devastating losses from the recession. He said the recovery is still in its early stages, and that it will be uneven in the months ahead.

"Things never go completely in a smooth line," Obama said during a speech Friday. "This report is a sign that our economy is getting stronger by the day."

However, the weakness in private hiring rattled Wall Street. Stock tumbled and bond prices rose, as investors sought the safety of U.S. Treasurys. The Dow Jones industrial average fell about 175 points in early trading.

The unemployment rate, which is derived from a separate survey than the payroll figures, fell to 9.7 percent from 9.9 percent. The dip partly reflected 322,000 people leaving the labor force for a variety of reasons.

All told, 15 million people were unemployed in May.


Counting people who have given up looking for work and part-timers who would rather be working full time, the "underemployment" rate fell to 16.6 percent in May from 17.1 percent in April. That reflected fewer people forced into part-time work. Still, the high underemployment figure shows how difficult it is for jobseekers to find work.

The number of people out of work six months or longer reached 6.76 million in May, a new high. They made up 46 percent of all unemployed people, also a record high.

Employers across a range of industries last month added jobs at a slower pace — or cut them. Factories, professional and business services, leisure and hospitality companies, and education and health care firms all slowed hiring. Financial services, construction companies and retailers all pared jobs. Government, however, led the way in hiring, adding a whopping 390,000 positions last month.

Job gains in April were the same as first reported, while payrolls in March were slightly less — 208,000 versus 230,000.

The prospect of persistently high unemployment is likely to prevent consumers from going on the kinds of shopping sprees they typically do during early phases of recoveries. That's a key reason why this recovery isn't as energetic as those usually seen in the past.

Workers did see wages rise modestly last month.

Nationwide, average hourly earnings rose to $22.57, from $22.50 in April. However, inflation was nibbling into paychecks. Over the past 12 months, wages rose 1.9 percent, while inflation was up 2.2 percent.

The unemployment rate in October hit 10.1 percent, a 26-year high. Some analysts think it could go a bit higher and peak at 10.2 or 10.4 percent by June. However, that's lower than some forecasts earlier this year of 11 percent.

About 125,000 new jobs are needed each month just to keep up with population growth and prevent the unemployment rate from rising.

Hiring isn't expected to be consistently strong enough to quickly drive down the unemployment rate this year. Economists think the rate will remain above 9 percent by the November midterm elections. That could make Democratic and Republican incumbents in Congress vulnerable.

Only 20 percent of Americans consider the economy in good condition, according to an Associated Press-GfK Poll conducted in mid-May.

Chrysler LLC said and Ford Motor Co. last month announced plans to hire as auto sales have risen. But others are still laying off workers. Hewlett-Packard Co. said this week it is cutting 9,000 jobs in its technology services division. And chocolate-maker Hershey Co. may cut 600 jobs.

Read the story

Posted by

Paul
Paul Roesch
Realtor, Auctioneer, CAI, AARE, CES, GPPA, ATS
Marketing Director 
Certified Distressed Property Expert, CDPE
618-407-8479 cell
proesch@ptauctions.net

 Add me as a Friend on Facebook Paul M. Roesch                                                                        

Free Sign Bidder Early Bird Notification of Upcoming Auctions

Auctionitnow  Father Time Auctions St Louis MO

All original text, video, and photo content is the exclusive property of Paul Roesch and / or Palatium Auctions (the Company) and may not be used without expressed written permission. All information deemed reliable but not guaranteed. All personal, real and intellectual property is subject to prior sale, change or withdrawal. Neither the Company or information provider(s) shall be responsible for any typographical errors, misinformation, and misprints and shall be held totally harmless. Listing(s) information is provided for consumers personal, non-commercial use and may not be used for any purpose other than to identify prospective properties consumers may be interested in purchasing. The Company has no control over the quality, safety or legality of the Auction Items listed, the truth or accuracy of the listings or any other information provided by Sellers about the Items. Listings may be sold, withdrawn at any time or subject to change without notice.

close

This entry hasn't been re-blogged:

Re-Blogged By Re-Blogged At
Topic:
ActiveRain Community
Location:
Missouri
Tags:
unemployment
paul roesch
father time auctions st louis mo
accredited real estate auctions
real estate auctioneer agent

Post a Comment
Spam prevention
Spam prevention
Post a Comment
Spam prevention

What's the reason you're reporting this blog entry?

Are you sure you want to report this blog entry as spam?

Rainmaker
402,575

Paul Roesch CDPE 618-233-1000

Real Estate Auctioneer CAI St Louis MO Auctions
How Does an Auction Work
*
*
*
*
Spam prevention

Additional Information