HAMP Fails...again

By
Real Estate Agent with RE/MAX Affiliates

Last April, the Congressional Oversight Panel found the program to be struggling to get off the ground despite having been in action for a year and a half. The latest evaluation of the Home Affordable Modification Program (HAMP) came out Tuesday and the result was -- same deal.  HAMP has undergone tweaks since April. But the Congressional Oversight Panel, created to issue periodic reports on the TARP bailout program, found little improvement in performance.  Instead of helping 3 million to 4 million struggling mortgage borrowers keep their homes, as originally projected, HAMP will prevent only about 700,000 to 800,000 foreclosures. That number is dwarfed by the 8 million to 13 million foreclosures expected to occur by 2012.  Through the end of October, there have been 519,648 permanent modifications made.  And, since the Treasury Department lost the authority to further restructure the program at the end of October, bolstering its prospects is no longer likely, the report said. In fact, banks are offering more modifications through their own process than through the government's.  The new report cited several reasons for the program's failure. For one, servicers, the companies hired by banks to manage the loans, earn extra profits through fees imposed during foreclosure. Because of that, servicers were preventing or delaying modifications.

 

Another big obstacle was that many loans in trouble often came burdened with second mortgages -- home equity loans or lines of credit -- that had to sign off on potential deals.  Because so many homes are worth less than the borrowers owe, there is little money to cover the first loan, let alone a second mortgage. So many banks in the second position refused to sign off unless they were paid something.  The oversight panel also faulted Treasury for not having effective means of collecting and analyzing HAMP data. The department, said the panel, did not even set meaningful goals against which to weigh the program's effectiveness.  Because participation has been so limited, HAMP will probably only spend about $4 billion of the $30 billion allocated for it.  Even the loans that have been permanently modified through HAMP have not performed well. Many have already re-defaulted, and that means taxpayer money down the drain.

Posted by

*************************************************************************************

Nick Dailey (CDPE) - Short Sale & Investment Specialist - Northern Kentucky & Greater Cincinnati

Helping families in Northern Kentucky avoid foreclosure.  Northern Kentucky MLS listings of homes for sale.  

Website: www.NickDailey.com

Mobile Site: nickd.m.remax-ohio.com

 

View Nick Dailey's profile on LinkedIn

 

close

This entry hasn't been re-blogged:

Re-Blogged By Re-Blogged At
Groups:
Short Sales
Short Sales and Forclosures ONLY
Short Sale Specialists & Pre-Foreclosure Education
Short Sale REALTORS®
Tags:
short sale
northern kentucky real estate
hamp
northern kentucky loan modification

Post a Comment
Spam prevention
Spam prevention
Show All Comments
Rainmaker
508,301
Jim Patton
Aspire Home Real Estate 209-404-0816 - Modesto, CA
Realtor - Stanislaus ,Merced, San Joaquin Counties

Good post Nick.  Once again showing how well our government fixes things by throwing money at the problem.

Dec 15, 2010 06:19 AM #1
Post a Comment
Spam prevention
Show All Comments

What's the reason you're reporting this blog entry?

Are you sure you want to report this blog entry as spam?

Rainmaker
30,111

Nick Dailey

RE/MAX: Northern Kentucky Real Estate - NKY MLS - Short Sale
Ask me a question
*
*
*
*
Spam prevention

Additional Information