10 ways to prepare for an earthquake

By
Real Estate Agent with Ewing & Associates/Sotheby's International Realty

The Japan earthquake and tsunami definitely shook the entire global awareness.  I read an article from an email newsletter distribution that give out good tips on how to prepare for an earthquake.

 

  • Earthquakes rattle both nerves and the contents of your home. Make sure that overhead light fixtures are anchored securely and that breakable and heavy objects are placed on lower shelves and cabinets, not up high. It also helps to keep heavy, wall-mounted objects like mirrors and frames away from seating areas. If needed, install bolts and latches on cabinets.
  • Ensure that there is no faulty electrical wiring or leaky gas connections anywhere around the home. These are both potential fire sources. Bolt and brace water heaters and gas appliances to wall studs. And most importantly, know how to turn your utilities off.
  • If you notice significant cracks in the ceilings or foundation of your home, don’t ignore them. Consult a general contractor or seismic retrofit specialist to take a look around and assess if work should be done. You never know, some earthquake touch-ups might result in greater energy-efficiency.
  • In the garage, make sure that anything flammable, pesticides, and any chemical products are kept in secure places where they cannot spill.
  • Pick out a “safe place” to take cover if an earthquake hits. Indoors, this would be under a desk or any sturdy, large piece of furniture that’s away from windows, mirrors, and pieces of furniture that could potentially topple over. Once you’ve found something to hide under, remember to duck, cover, and hold on. If hiding under something is not a quick option, secure yourself against an inside wall.
  • Stash an earthquake kit or two in easily found location. 
  •  General 72-hour survival kits are also an option since most contain the same supplies as earthquake-specific kits. Whatever kit you choose, make certain that the basics — first-aid supplies, non-perishable food, water (at least one gallon per person, per day), flashlights with extra batteries, cash, sturdy shoes, a can opener, a battery-powered or hand-crank radio, and a wrench or pillars to turn off utilities — are included. Also ensure that the kit can accommodate the size of your family and special needs like medical conditions that anyone might have.
  • Epicureans experience earthquakes, too ... SF Weekly has recommendations on how to prepare "The Ultimate Foodie Earthquake Kit."
  •  It’s not entirely pleasant to think about, but the Red Cross offers a wealth of information on what to do before, during, and after an earthquake. It’s certainly worth reviewing yourself or with your family especially if there are kids in the house. And if you don’t live in an earthquake-prone area, the Red Cross also provides info on other events ranging from wildfires to tsunamis.
  •   Vet hospital – know where to take your pets for emergency treatment.


 

 

 

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Rainmaker
137,711
Kellie Morrissey
Keller Williams Realty Success LLC - Littleton, CO
CO Realtor CRS, GRI, CDPE

Very timely post...Thanks for the tips... We are all praying for the victums in Japan.

Kellie

 

Mar 15, 2011 04:51 PM #1
Rainer
67,619
Michael Weaver
The Vearus Group - Indianapolis, IN
Real Estate + Technology

Fortunately, there are not too many here in the midwest.  I feel awful for those who are dealing with them right now.

Mar 15, 2011 04:55 PM #2
Rainer
9,996
Yvonne Connor
Sutton Group -West Coast Realty - Vancouver, BC
Yvonne Connor

Yikes Angela,

I hope we never have to experience what Japan is going through, but I know it is a possible eventuality being here in Vancouver. Thanks for the info.

Yvonne

Mar 15, 2011 04:59 PM #3
Rainer
365,262
J. A. Michail
Real Property Management of Sarasota & Manatee - Sarasota, FL
Real Property Management of Sarasota & M

I have ten suggestions:

  1. Move.
  2. Move.
  3. Move.
  4. Move.
  5. Move.
  6. Move.
  7. Move.
  8. Move.
  9. Move.
  10. Move.

Mar 15, 2011 05:15 PM #4
Rainer
32,055
Angela Wong
Ewing & Associates/Sotheby's International Realty - Calabasas, CA

john, that's interesting - may be you can share 10 ways to prepare for flood in your area instead of move - haahaaa

Mar 15, 2011 05:27 PM #5
Rainmaker
686,539
Hella Mitschke Rothwell
(831) 626-4000 - Honolulu, HI
Hawaii & California Real Estate Broker

Hi Angela: That's an excellent list you made. We had that earthquake in Northern California not too long ago, and the Tsunami now. We certainly take preparedness seriously. It is very important to have food that does not need refrigertion (10 lbs of rice, for example) plus canned goods and drinking water available, plus something for cooking on when the electricity goes out (we have propane tanks for our barbeque available). Then, of course, you need a warm and dry shelter. We always also keep an extra 20 lbs of dog food for our 3 dogs.

Mar 15, 2011 05:49 PM #6
Rainer
32,055
Angela Wong
Ewing & Associates/Sotheby's International Realty - Calabasas, CA

hella,

 

that's a great addition to the list.  thx

Mar 16, 2011 04:17 PM #7
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Rainer
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Angela Wong

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