How High Should Artwork Be Hung and Other Tips on Hanging Artwork

Reblogger Bill Jones
Real Estate Agent with Discovery Real Estate Ltd. - "Homes By Jones"

When comes to hanging Artwork the only thing I'm good at is hitting my thumb with the tack Hammer trying to put in those small nails.  Here is some information from Donna Dazzo is president and owner of Designed to Appeal. That really Appealed to me. :)

Original content by Donna Dazzo

Many of us like to be surrounded by photos of our family and beautiful pieces of artwork, but are afraid we are going to "make a mistake" when hanging them on the wall. Or worse, some of us don't even know that the pictures are not hung properly. For you and others to get the most appreciation out of your pictures, here are some helpful tips on how high a picture should be hung to how to hang a group of pictures: 

  • Generally, pictures should be hung at eye level, but whose eye level? Hang it so that the center of the picture is at 5'8" to 5'10".

  • The height at which it should be hung should relate to the height of the furniture (and the objects on it) and not be hung too high. Otherwise the artwork will look as if it's floating. Hanging artwork too high is one of the most common mistakes made.

  • The width of a piece of art or group of pictures should be a minimum of 2/3 the length of the piece of furniture it is hanging over, and should not be wider than the width of the furniture it is hanging over.

  • The size of the piece of art or group of artwork should relate to the size of the wall on which it is hung.

  • If hanging two or more pictures next to each other, the ideal spacing is 3 to 4 inches between them but no more than 8 inches.
  • Use a laser level to make it easier to hang pieces side by side evenly. A laser level, which can be found in national chains such as Home Depot or Lowe's, is placed against the wall. It emits a red laser beam along the wall so that you can find the spot to place your hook or nail, once the liquid in the bubble is at its level position.
  • While a laser level makes things easier, make sure that the pair of same-sized frames have their hooks and/or wires in the same spot. Unfortunately, this is not always the case. If they don't, then use the laser level to make sure the top of the frames are aligned, then measure down from the top of each frame to determine where you should place the nail or hook.

  • If hanging a group of pictures of different sizes, lay them out on the floor first for the optimal arrangement. There aren't any rules here, but the arrangement should appear cohesive and balanced. You can also trace the arrangement on a very large piece of paper and then hang the paper on the wall as a guide for placement.
  • Use the proper hardware for the type of wall (e.g., sheetrock vs plaster) and the weight of the picture.
  • Use adhesive anchors like ZotsTM on the back of each corner of the frame to ensure that the picture doesn't move.
  • If you are staging your home for sale, it is best to stay away from nudes or other artwork that might offend a potential buyer in the target market.

  • Use art to bring some color into an otherwise neutral room. Or if you are afraid to use too much of a bold color in larger pieces in the room such as bedding or the fabric of a sofa, you can still add this bold color to the room through artwork.
  • If hanging art on a wall with busy wallpaper, make sure they art you have chosen has a simple pattern and/or lots of white.
  • The pictures in a room should relate to one another in style. For example, traditional botanical prints and abstract paintings don't really go well in the same room.
  • Placing art vertically can add the illusion of height to a room. Same with placing art horizontally: it can serve to widen the room.

  • A single large piece of art can have more impact and draw your eye to the focal point of a room more than a grouping of pictures.
  • When hanging a group of pictures on the wall of a staircase, hang them diagonally next to each other. Once you find the optimal placement for one of them, increase/decrease the height of the next one by the height of the step.

Note:  All photos are from Designd to Appeal's stagings of homes for sale.

© Copyright 2011 Designed to Appeal, LLC.  All Rights Reserved. 

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 About the AuthorDonna Dazzo is president and owner of Designed to Appeal, a home staging company serving New York City and the Hamptons.  Designed to Appeal helps homeowners and real estate agents sell homes quickly and profitably, by expertly creating an environment that buyers want to live in. Designed to Appeal also helps homeowners not looking to sell with interior redesign, which involves using mostly what the homeowner already has.  Donna writes frequently on home staging and interior decorating and design topics.

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Rainer
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Chandler Real Estate Liz Harris, MBA
Liz Harris Realty - Chandler, AZ
#ChandlerRealEstateAgent

Thanks for reblogging this!  I have ALWAYS had questions on the best way to hang artwork and this answers them all!

Jun 07, 2011 04:56 PM #1
Rainer
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Paul Lesieur
203kloanmn - North Oaks, MN

I am getting my wife to read this, we have been discussing this for years, she is petite and I am 5' 8" and the right height for artwork is something we never agreed on.

Jun 08, 2011 12:26 AM #2
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Bill Jones

Realtor (403-701-1739) Airdrie & Calgary Area Homes and Condos
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