In Defense of the Short Sale Selling, Loan Mod Applying, Principal Reduction Requesting Public

By
Real Estate Broker/Owner with Mint Properties, Lic. #01871795 Lic. #01871795
https://activerain.com/droplet/swz

In Defense of the Short Sale Selling, Loan Mod Applying, Principal Reduction Requesting Public

I just read the AR newsletter featured post entitled, “Rewards for being a debtor... Punishment for those that are not,” and it really got me going this Sunday morning. An agent sets out her opinion as a free and clear homeowner who is troubled as she watches the government continue to offer program after program to try to solve the housing crisis. It is an interesting read but I disagree strongly that those who are being asked to wait in line for a government program are being “rewarded.” I know the fact that I live in California strongly affects my opinion in the matter -- the financial devastation here is just too great.

Interestingly, a few months ago, I was approached by a homeowner who felt similarly, and we had a great discussion. She was, what I would like to describe as the perfect hybrid, and thus a good illustration of the issues affecting us in California. Although she was not a cash buyer, she put $250,000 down on a $500,000 home. So, although she was a debtor, she clearly had the sensibilities of a cash buyer. And even with her large down payment, she was actually still underwater by $30,000 or $40,000 and she did not have the additional resources to sell or refinance her property. She also felt very strongly that people were being rewarded by the government for bad behavior. Of course she was going to continue to pay, she had invested so much with her down payment and all the payments she made toward her mortgage. However, a couple weeks after our conversation, she also lost her job due to the economic downturn. Personally, I hope that she is able to obtain some relief and save her home with a loan mod or complete a short sale and I don’t consider it a “reward.”

Here’s my take on the housing crisis. The lenders, in essence, introduced a bunch of straw buyers into the real estate marketplace. Their argument for why they did it is essentially that the government made the incentives to make fraudulent loans so delicious that they just could not resist. See they love money so much, they just had to do it. In fact, the money got so good and it was so easy that they wanted to speed up the process of making money even more, so they started committing more fraud (robo-signing) to make the original fraud more profitable. Yes, my friends this is high level finance we are dealing with here -- mere mortals just wouldn’t understand this stuff.

Resulting scenarios in California and other “Sand States” work something like this hypothetical: New home development built in 2004 - 2006. 200 houses and maybe 25 of the buyers could really afford the prices they paid AND they made down payments. And then there were of course those unfortunate enough to believe the bank would not loan you the money if you really could not afford it. These folks believed in the integrity of “the system” -- how unfortunate! They were sold interest only loans and ARMs that they cannot refinance out of now and they MIGHT have been able to keep up with their home enough to still have their name on the deed.  They can make payments for awhile but they really can’t afford the prices they paid-- that's probably about 75 people out of the 200. Now they all received appraisals supporting those prices based on sales of homes made to at least 100 people who clearly could not afford those homes at all.  Those bogus buyers were in essence straw buyers that quickly lost their homes.  So, almost six or seven years after those homes were built, about 125 of those homes have probably gone through some sort of process, short sale or foreclosure. And more than likely almost all of those 25 people who could afford those prices are still left among the 75 who are still struggling or are applying for a loan mod.  Now if you paid $500,000 for a $250,000 house because you were defrauded and $250,000 is subsequently reduced from the principal, where is the reward?  If a court were to pronounce that judgment, not many would say it was unjust.

Those 25 people who could afford the prices they paid of course still feel defrauded, as it will take 10 -12 years of payments to get their loan balances down to the home prices of today and they cannot refinance to today’s lower interest rates. So, of course, the temptation to walk away is high -- but only because it is cheaper and more expedient than trying to sue. In fact, lenders are now beginning to include language in their short sale approval letters requesting waivers over their very many legal issues on these files. And in some cases, they are paying home owners to do short sales in order to clean the slate. So they are, in essence, seeking settlements. So, in my view, government efforts to intervene with “programs” are efforts trying to create a mass settlement of these legal issues. Something everyone can live with so we can all recover and move on. And, I do not envy those who are living in a home, cannot afford to sue, and are waiting around for the government to save them.

Many people I’m helping never envisioned being in the position of waiting on the government for a solution. Many are people who have never even had a derogatory on their credit report before these times. The solutions offered damage their credit, do nothing to address the investment they’ve lost, and in some cases they can be asked to pay taxes whether they get a loan mod, allow a foreclosure, or elect a short sale!  Not to mention people who have lost jobs because this whole mess has affected the entire economy. Believe me, it takes a lot before people will walk away from a down payment and 6 or 7 years of payments, and that is what I see a lot of people doing in 2012.  My phone has been ringing almost non stop for the past two months for short sale consults.

Rewards? Hardly. Are you going to benefit as a free and clear owner of property? Probably through a stabilized housing market and a better economy, but not directly, no.  I do agree that the whole things stinks. However, saying that people who are applying for government assisted re-fi’s, loan mods with principal reductions, and short sales are being “rewarded” is not exactly accurate. They are, for the most part, good people trying to do the best they can in a bad situation.

Tni LeBlanc is an independent Real Estate Broker, Attorney, Short Sale Agent, Certified HAFA Specialist (CHS), and Certified Distressed Property Expert (CDPE) and Short Sale and Foreclosure Resource Agent (SFR) serving Santa Maria, Orcutt, Lompoc, Nipomo, and Arroyo Grande on the Central Coast of California.

* Nothing in this article is intended to solicit listings currently under contract with another broker. This article offers no legal or tax advice and is for information purposes only. Those considering a short sale are advised to consult with their own attorney for legal advice, and their tax professional for tax advice prior to entering into a short sale listing agreement.

Copyright © 2012 Tni LeBlanc *In Defense of the Short Sale Selling, Loan Mod Applying, Principal Reduction Requesting Public*

Posted by

Tni LeBlanc, Broker
(805) 878-9879 mobile/text

tni@mintprop.com
www.MintProp.com
CalBRE #01871795

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Rainmaker
637,278
Maria Morton
Chartwell Kansas City Realty - Kansas City, MO
Kansas City Real Estate 816-560-3758

Tni, long long ago, banks were part of the communities they served. Bankers often knew personally the clients to whom they loaned money for a mortgage. If a mortgagor had a catastrophe in their life, the bank knew about it, understood, and worked with the person so that they could keep their home. Of course, there were some pirates amongst banksters then; there just seems to be a higher percentage of pirates in banking today. Rather than pay the banksters more money to not help more people, perhaps our government representatives should do their job and protect the people from corporate greed. While I am not a proponent of government regulation and unnecessary laws, I do believe that part of the role of the government in a capitalist society must be to protect its' citizens from corporate greed.

Feb 06, 2012 04:55 PM #45
Rainmaker
427,439
Leslie Ebersole
Swanepoel T3 Group - Saint Charles, IL
I help brokers build businesses they love.

Tni you have linked to an AR Member's Only post in your public post. While I don't think that Member's Only is all that private, the purpose of Member's Only is to allow real estate people to discuss issues internally. Judi produces a wide range of posts for her community and if she wanted this public she would have made it so. You need to either break the link and remove the reference or make your post Member's Only.

 

Feb 06, 2012 05:08 PM #46
Rainmaker
300,136
Marti Steele Kilby, CRS
Steele Group Realty - La Mesa, CA
Broker/Owner, San Diego, CA

Tni, great post.  I agree with Brian, comment # 23 that principal reduction is and would have been, a quicker, less costly solution.  I also totally agree with Pamel's comment #29....I am sooooo tired of listening to crap about this burst in the boom being the fault of people who just wanted to buy a house!  Excuse me, but they weren't the ones who did the underwriting on these loans....they simply saw it as a time to get in the homeownership game....based on approvals provided by banks.

Feb 06, 2012 06:37 PM #47
Rainmaker
414,607
Tni LeBlanc, Realtor®, J.D.
Mint Properties, Lic. #01871795 - Santa Maria, CA
Tenacious Tni (805) 878-9879

David - I agree it was an opportunity lost.  If you look at how the HAP program works for military personnel caught up in this storm I think it has some very important characteristics.  It only addresses people that bought during a certain period, it makes them share in 10% of the amount lost.  I agree we need the better ideas to take hold.  The way they have gone about things has been very expensive, with all the money spent the situation could be fixed already.  Freeing people from debt caused by a mass fraud in mortgage market is not giving them a freebie or a bonus.

John - It is interesting to hear the position that foreclosures will wipe the slate clean.  Last I checked the lenders continue to manipulate the market by keeping these properties on the sidelines.  How about getting these properties out of the hands of the lenders altogether.

Marte - Yes you won't make everyone happy no matter what type of plan you come up with.  But, hopefully you will fix the economy which will eventually make everyone happy.

Chris Ann - I think if the loans were re-structured so that people made payments for 5 years without any interest -- you wouldn't have to call it principal reduction and it would have a great stabilizing effect for those who want to stay in their homes.  But something has to be done about the equity position people are in.  Most people aren't going to sign up for a 60 year loan solution when they can declare BK instead and put this behind them -- plus they still can't sell until they catch up equity wise.   It's very difficult for me to tell someone who makes $15 an hour to stomach $150,000 in bad debt caused by fraud in the market.  That's what's going on here in CA.  The banks could implement these programs on their own, they don't need the government to tell them to do it, but they haven't. 

Anthony - Very true!

Feb 06, 2012 09:27 PM #48
Rainmaker
3,253,144
Sally K. & David L. Hanson
EXP Realty 414-525-0563 - Brookfield, WI
WI Realtors - Luxury - Divorce

 There will always be people who try and take advantage of anything offered....Relief is exactly what a short sale offers to people thru no fault of their own are unable to provide that to themselves...great post....!

Feb 06, 2012 09:45 PM #49
Rainmaker
414,607
Tni LeBlanc, Realtor®, J.D.
Mint Properties, Lic. #01871795 - Santa Maria, CA
Tenacious Tni (805) 878-9879

Pam - I agree.  And in my area as well, personal responsibility is not the primary issue.  That was why I felt obligated to throw out a very typical scenario with new home tracts built during the boom and also to illustrate how deeply people are underwater in my area.  We all counted on there being a certain level of integrity in the system and it just wasn't there at the time.  Having debt canceled due to the fraud in the marketplace is not a "reward."  Free and clear owners and those with equity are afraid that someone might be given something that they won't get. 

However, if your mortgage debt is reduced to what the home is actually worth -- you still have to pay for the home (with interest!).  If the prices were fake, what have they gained?  In addition, let's not forget that cash buyers benefit heavily from the existence of loans in the market, it drives prices up (so we see!) and they are counting on it driving up prices (eventually) again when financing loosens up.  I wrote this in part because I just can't believe that when you look at what is going on in the Sand States that you can think that people are gaining with principal reduction.  It is an attempt to make people whole.

Jaime - Yes, there was a lot of bad advice out there from agents.  There was also a lot of good advice that was not taken.  I know I gave out plenty of good advice that was ignored because if the bank is handing out loans like lollipops not many people are going to listen.  You are right people took a chance.  Too bad the opportunities presented were wrapped in negative amortization loans.

Dawn - Exactly.  No one is coming out of this without being affected in one way or another.  We need a realistic and fair solution that will help us to pick up and move on.

Bill - Yes they are, and why?  There have been some improvements for sure.  But many servicers just don't think they have responsibility to even process short sales in a timely fashion.  They should be paying people who want short sales to do them and in some cases they are.  It's the folks that want to keep their homes that offer the biggest challenge.  For many of them, only something like principal reduction will work.

Lloyd - The banks voluntary programs thus far suck.  And the government programs do not ask or require enough of them.  It could all be done voluntarily by the banks, but it will take a rightful amount of pressure to accomplish it  -- probably from the courts.  I don't think this should be at tax payer expense.

Feb 06, 2012 10:16 PM #50
Rainmaker
414,607
Tni LeBlanc, Realtor®, J.D.
Mint Properties, Lic. #01871795 - Santa Maria, CA
Tenacious Tni (805) 878-9879

Michael - You said it well.  I know my experience as a Californian puts me on the far edge of this issue.  People here aren't just underwater ... they are drowning.

Thanks Jeanne - Yes, we need a national consensus and national solution.  There were warning signs for sure.  And yes it felt good when prices went up.  I don't think this generation will ever forget this and we will all be wiser because of it.  And, we will all pay in the coming years for the trust that has been abused.

All Mountain - I do think getting the banks to "voluntarily" do principal reduction is a good proposal.  But, they haven't voluntarily done much....  I think people believe that the government will continue to pay and provide incentives.  Probably a realistic thought given the track record...

Christine - Yes, I think Judi's opinions reflect where she lives.  And, mine are definitely affected by living in CA. 

Feb 06, 2012 10:50 PM #51
Rainmaker
414,607
Tni LeBlanc, Realtor®, J.D.
Mint Properties, Lic. #01871795 - Santa Maria, CA
Tenacious Tni (805) 878-9879

Hi Katerina -- How funny.  I just received two books from my amazon list written by Thomas Sowell!  They are sitting on my nightstand.  I'll have to add that one to my list.  I agree there were bets that were made by some.  However, in my area most of the bettors now just want out.  Doesn't matter if you offered them some principal reduction or modification or not.  However, people who want to keep their homes and have been able to hang on this long will probably want to and be able to keep them if they get some relief.  I think the $35,000 a year people who bought million dollar houses have pretty much been flushed out of my market -- their negative ARM loans probably already exploded on them.  Of course they have responsibility -- but the system already has consequences for that -- what about the people who were affected by that behavior who received a faulty appraisal based on that "comp?"  Did they know that house was sold to someone who could never pay for it?   I think now is the time for a solution to be implemented.  I think short sales during this time should be a one page application that is processed in a week.  Surely, what has gone on is not fair, and surely there has to be something we can do to make things better for the housing market and the economy overall.  Right now we have a false market, so many people being held on the sidelines.  I don't know what will fix it but I do have some ideas.  I also am quite certain that any relief for people still in this situation can not be categorized as a "reward."

Hi Phil - No I don't think we disagree on everything either and yes, it is complicated.

Feb 06, 2012 11:27 PM #52
Rainmaker
414,607
Tni LeBlanc, Realtor®, J.D.
Mint Properties, Lic. #01871795 - Santa Maria, CA
Tenacious Tni (805) 878-9879

Hi Judi - After receiving your email about the post being member's only, I immediately took out the link and your name.  I was a bit mystified because I checked it before writing this post.  Now I see from this comment that the post was changed into a Member's Only post.  Well at least I know I'm not going crazy.  So, I must have read and linked to your post before it was Member's Only.   Indeed I was surprised it was public and because it was -- I thought it fair game.  

However, I do think we are speaking about the same subject matter because I do not think that principal forgiveness is problematic in these times for the reasons I articulated in my blog.  We just disagree.  Again, I know my views are heavily influenced by where I live and where the values are now.  So we do disagree.  All these issues do intertwine, foreclosures, short sales, owners with equity, free and clear owners. Short sales, loan mods and principal reductions.   Even free and clear owners will benefit from a stabilized housing market.  If all the people who can afford to pay or are hanging on by a thread in a tough economy throw in the towel and give their home back to the bank -- what does that do for any of us?  In some areas of the country, the losses are just too great to bear, and many of the folks that are left were more than others defrauded by all the straw buyer activity. 

Cash buyers benefit heavily from the existence of loans in the market, it drives prices up (so we see!) and they are counting on it driving it up prices (eventually) again.  We see this now in the condo market in my area where financing is almost gone for some complexes.  Nothing but cash buyers and the prices are very low.  When you speak with cash buyers around here about why they are gobbling up condos it is because they are waiting on the run up in prices when financing becomes available for these units again.  I also think the fact that someone can sit out these troubled times without being in danger of losing their home or ruining their credit is a pretty good reward and well worth the cash.

Feb 06, 2012 11:51 PM #53
Rainmaker
414,607
Tni LeBlanc, Realtor®, J.D.
Mint Properties, Lic. #01871795 - Santa Maria, CA
Tenacious Tni (805) 878-9879

Carla - Yes the banksters have received A LOT of interest on these bad loans.  Not to mention the beauty of an interest only loan product.  They just keep paying and paying and the loan never goes down.  Now you have to give a bonus to the person that decided to make that loan widely available!

Hi Tammy - I pay taxes too.   And, I'd like to see the housing market rebound.  It does not benefit me to insist that there be no intervention so that things still appear fair in a simplistic way.  That view point ignores the legal issues and the fraud that occurred.  I don't have any problem with the banks being forced into giving principal reductions.  Whether that is through the existing Making Home Affordable Principal Reduction Alternative or a "voluntary" program instituted by the banks.  Government should be pressing on the banks to "voluntarily" do something to keep people in their homes or short sell -- whatever they prefer.  What have they voluntarily come up with so far?  Not much.  And it's a little late to say let the banks fail.  They did fail and they were propped back up by the government.  Now they control the housing market.

Maria - I also think that government could have done a better job here.  There should have been some sort of intervention at least once things got going.  Can't do anything about that now but we can try to clean up this mess.  I would love to see a lot of institutions return to a more local model.

Leslie - Well look here the AR police showed up!  LOL.  FYI - Judi acknowledges changing her post from public to "member's only."  See her comment #43 above.  She emailed me also that it was member's only so I took the link and her name out of the blog.  Then I read her comment that the post had been changed into a member's only post due to the comments she received on it.   I thought I had gone crazy because I did recall checking first and it WAS public. 

I don't think it is reasonable to ask someone to remove a link after you change a post to member's only.  Do you?  Nonetheless it was done.  Had I known that the post was changed, I would not have removed the link or attribution.  I do respect the "Member's Only" function -- however when you make a post public you can't really take it back by making it Member's Only.  I do appreciate you telling me in my public post (and not an email) what you think I need to do.  I will refrain from returning the favor. ;-)

Feb 07, 2012 12:27 AM #54
Rainmaker
414,607
Tni LeBlanc, Realtor®, J.D.
Mint Properties, Lic. #01871795 - Santa Maria, CA
Tenacious Tni (805) 878-9879

Hi Marti - Yes, it would have wouldn't it?  Especially after all of this.  I also don't think that buying a house should have been turned into the single worst financial decision any one could have made, and many people that bought 2004-2007 in my area feel that way.

Sally & David - Very true.  And yes, short sales do offer much needed relief.

Feb 07, 2012 12:38 AM #55
Ambassador
2,297,713
1~Judi Barrett
Integrity Real Estate Services 118 SE AVE N, Idabel, OK 74745 - Idabel, OK
BS Ed, Integrity Real Estate Services -IDABEL OK

Tni,   The post was changed from public to members only, but was done early on, as soon as comments were going some place that the post was not directed at.  My post was posted on the 3rd and changed to members only on 4th.  It would have been members only when your post was written...

Feb 07, 2012 05:25 AM #56
Ambassador
2,864,019
Tammy Lankford,
Lane Realty Eatonton, GA Lake Sinclair, Milledgeville, 706-485-9668 - Eatonton, GA
Broker GA Lake Sinclair/Eatonton/Milledgeville

Tni- so how you would like if the government "forced" you into commission reductions because people are in need of them.  If the bank loaned someone 100,000 at X% interest that is what should be paid back.  As for loan officers who committed fraud they should be prosecuted. But little or none of them were bank fraud without knowing, willing participants in the buyers.

And I can only say, thank goodness my congressman did NOT vote for any of the bailouts, or I could never vote for him again.  My stupid Senators on the other hand, well, I'll see if I can't help replace those idiots.

Feb 07, 2012 06:46 AM #57
Rainer
298,462
Momentum Realty
North Orange County CA Real Estate Specialists - Yorba Linda, CA
Orange County CA Real Estate Agent

Hey Tni- Great post & what a fire storm you started with this hot topic! 

It's scary to see some of the comments from people who still don't truly understand what took place and who's to blame. For anyone that still doesn't understand how this all fell apart, I suggest that they watch the documentary "House of Cards". It aired several years ago, and explains how the Wall Street "gurus" packed loans together & sold them as "A" paper, when they were actually riddled with sub prime, neg am garbage, and the ratings companies went right along with them. This is what started the meltdown, not people that couldn't afford their mortgages, or wanted a free ride.

Lest ye be judged people : ) I'm just sayin'...

Have a great week Tni!

Gina Lemos

Feb 07, 2012 12:50 PM #58
Rainmaker
453,651
Allison Stewart
St.Cloud Homes - Saint Cloud, FL
St. Cloud Fl Realtor, Osceola County Real Estate 407-616-9904

Hi Tni

I agree with your analysis, and have long said that this mess is far from temporary. The impact has left tourist areas and subordinate communities surrounding them beleaguered.   What we are seeing in the aftermath of this event, is the re-emergence of cash buyers into the housing market. Many of whom are investing now for long term holdings (rather than quick flips also popular several years ago when the market artifiscially escalated.)    It is the clients such as the one you describe who still teeter precariously in the balance that are most affected and have little recourse.

Feb 07, 2012 09:38 PM #59
Rainmaker
414,607
Tni LeBlanc, Realtor®, J.D.
Mint Properties, Lic. #01871795 - Santa Maria, CA
Tenacious Tni (805) 878-9879

Hi Judi - All I can say is that when I read and checked the post it was public.  It is very difficult to change a post to member's only once it is out there as public -- I guess now you know that.  I was surprised when I received your email about it being member's only wondering how I missed that.  But I didn't -- I did check. 

The issue is controversial so I can understand that you now want to jump out of the discussion.  However, the post was public at one time and when I viewed it that is how it came up.  And since it was the comments received that inspired you to switch it to member's only, I really don't understand the issue anyway.  You can always delete comments on your own post.  And you published your opinion and my post is about your opinion.  Had I known the blog had been switched into Member's Only I would not have honored your request to remove the link -- I don't think that is a fair request.   I do respect the Member's Only thing but you can't have it both ways.

Feb 08, 2012 02:32 AM #60
Rainmaker
414,607
Tni LeBlanc, Realtor®, J.D.
Mint Properties, Lic. #01871795 - Santa Maria, CA
Tenacious Tni (805) 878-9879

Hi Tammy - Not many people like being forced into doing anything whether it be by the government or large  corporations or even an Homeowner's Association -- LOL.   From a short sale agents perspective, short sales with government involvement (Freddie, Fannie, HAFA) tend to go smoother because the lenders are forced to refrain from interfering with my listing contract.  On files without government involvement, I can spend hours and hours trying to protect my commission, because big banks rightly know that they have more power than an individual real estate broker.

Also, there is a concept in the law whereby if a contract is obtained through fraudulent means --  well that contract can be voided.  Many of these contracts were obtained through fraudulent means.  The introduction of a huge number of straw buyers who did not have the income or ability to pay back any portion of the loans they were given was fraud on the consumers who could afford (and did pay) those prices.  It is my contention that many/most of those straw buyers have been washed out of the market, and now is the time (in fact we are overdue) to provide real relief to underwater homeowners who were defrauded in this mess.

We agree that taxpayer bailout of the banks was not a good thing.  But I think the bailouts biggest flaw is that it did not exact any promises from the financial sector in exchange for playing hero.  There was no bang for our collective buck.   Pressure matters.  The market already pronounced its verdict on these practices and these folks should be out of business.  Government saved them.  I don't agree with that, but I don't have a problem with government making a similar effort to save individual homeowners by now putting pressure on the banks.  This could also be done through large lawsuits but I think that is an ineffective way to deal with it since the problem is so large and widespread.

Feb 08, 2012 02:57 AM #61
Rainmaker
414,607
Tni LeBlanc, Realtor®, J.D.
Mint Properties, Lic. #01871795 - Santa Maria, CA
Tenacious Tni (805) 878-9879

Gina - It is scary to see.  And I suppose I can see people hanging on to those views in states where people are $20,000 underwater.  But in CA, I am routinely dealing with people who make average incomes and are $200,000 underwater.  The amount of fraud that was introduced in the market was unreal.  Although I do not in anyway throw out personal responsibility -- the issues presented also have legal implications.  I'm just watching the announcement on the $26 billion dollar settlement for (part of) the foreclosure fraud.  Some folks just don't get it.  They really don't understand the degree to which the industry was misused and the damage that it caused. 

Allison - I agree.  the ability to hold out and not have to make any decisions right now is a benefit.  Or to have to distress sale quickly just because you had a rash of foreclosures in your neighborhood.  This crisis in many ways is about how long people can or are willing to hold out.  There will be legal remedies, but who knows who will be left standing to benefit. 

Feb 09, 2012 02:46 AM #62
Rainer
111,788
David A. Weaver
Peoples Bank & Trust Co. - Scottsdale, AZ
24 years helping folks finance their dreams.

Great post, you nailed it.  AZ like CA has been really hard hit, especially the newer subdivisions in the East and West valley area of Maricopa County.  It will be many, many years before any real recovery takes place here I am afraid.

Feb 10, 2012 05:37 AM #63
Rainmaker
102,592
Stephanie Anson
Secure Investments Realty - Gainesville, FL
Estates | Homes | Land | Investments

This situation are massive throughout the country and government are offering something that only qualified homeowners can acquire. Your client who lost a job, in my opinion, should have qualified for any government assitance as she is a good payer and it is just unfortunate that she lost her job. Santa Maria Short Sale Agents are getting this issue and i know you are helping this clients overcome this difficult times in their life.

Mar 26, 2012 03:33 PM #64
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