Forsyth Park, Savannah, GA

By
Real Estate Agent with Keller Williams Realty

Forsyth Park is the heart of Downtown Savannah life, providing leisure and rest to citizens and tourists.  This 30 acre green space crosses the border of the Historic and Victorian Districts, with Gaston Street to the north and Park Avenue to the south.  Stunning Victorian mansions surround the park on all sides, and the gorgeous oak and palmetto trees that typify the town are in abundance around its mile perimeter. 

 

Originally the park was only ten acres, an area donated by William Hodgson in the 1840’s.  It was expanded by twenty acres to its current size in 1851 and named for Georgia Governor John Forsyth.  The original ten acres is perfect for picnics, covered in shade by dozens of trees.  This area has plenty of space for walking with sidewalks symmetrically designed to lead to a central fountain.  The additional twenty acres are mostly comprised of two expansive, green fields that are ideal for the recreational games and events that are Forsyth Park’s great heritage.  You’ll also find two play grounds, a café, an amphitheater, a historic Fragrant Garden for the Blind, tennis and basketball courts, and a central Confederate Memorial Statue.

 

Perhaps the most visited spot in all of the Hostess City, the Parisian inspired fountain at the central-north end of the park is arguably its most recognizable landmark.  The fountain is romantically framed by a tunnel of arching branches, and is often the centerpiece of spring and summer weddings.  The water turns a festive shade of green during St. Patrick’s Day to welcome the crowds that swarm downtown annually for the nation’s second largest celebration (2nd only after New York City).

 

Whether seeking rest or activity, Forsyth Park is always bustling with people enjoying the outdoors in the heart of a vibrant city.  Pack a lunch, bring a soccer ball, sun bathe on a blanket, play fetch with your dog, read a chapter of your favorite new book, or watch all the hustle and bustle from the quite nook of an oak tree.

 

 

 

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