Top reasons to stay at your current job

By
Real Estate Agent with Keller Williams Realty

In this post, Anne Fisher from Cnn.com talks about why you should stay at your current job. Here are her 4 tips:

1. It's still a buyer's market, and competition is fierce. The 3.1 job seekers chasing each available job is a lot less daunting than the record high of 6.7 in July 2009 — but, notes Stevens, it's still twice as high as the 1.6 unemployed people per opening in November 2007, the month before the recession started. Okay, but if you already have an offer, why should you care? Because, Stevens says, the abundance of qualified candidates has the effect of driving down your market value: "Salaries and overall compensation packages may not be as attractive as when changing jobs in a better economy."

2. New hires are under more pressure now. "Companies hiring people now are expecting them to make a noticeable impact immediately, by increasing sales, cutting costs, or improving productivity," Stevens says. "In a strong economy, employers customarily give new hires about six months in which to prove themselves, but that window has been cut in half." That isn't necessarily a bad thing but, before you accept the new job you've been offered, make sure you understand the company's expectations — and decide whether you can meet them.

3. Last hired, first fired. "Newly hired employees may be the first ones affected by cutbacks," Stevens says. "The shorter time period you have for producing results, and the availability of lots of qualified candidates, means employers often pull the trigger sooner — and offer less generous severance, if any — than in a better economy." That's especially true if your cultural "fit" with the new organization isn't perfect. Frictionless teamwork and the need to achieve collective goals take on increased urgency in a shaky economy, she adds: "Those who don't fit in are out sooner." So before you take the new job offer, make sure the fit is solid.

4. Different isn't always better. "Some people quit their jobs based on one isolated incident, or one negative performance review" — or argument with a boss — "and then regret it," says Stevens, who has seen many cases of job changers' remorse. Since the only thing making you unhappy in your current job seems to be your difficult boss, consider looking around inside the company for some other opportunity.

See the Full Article at: http://management.fortune.cnn.com/2013/07/03/4-reasons-to-stay-in-your-current-job-for-now/?iid=obnetwork

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