Moving Motivations: What Would Make Americans Consider Uprooting?

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Mortgage and Lending with Diamond Residential Mortgage Corporation 031.0016549 NMLS#219299

Moving Motivations: What Would Make Americans Consider Uprooting?

A recent Harris Poll found Florida, California and Hawaii to be the states where Americans would most like to live (excluding where they live now), followed by Colorado and New York. But what might inspire Americans to actually consider such a move? While there are clear frontrunners, a lot of it depends on region, age, gender and more.

 

These are some of the results of The Harris Poll of 2,232 U.S. adults surveyed online between November 11 and 16, 2015. Full results of this study, including data tables, can be found here. •Just over half of Americans (52%) say they'd consider moving to another state to live in an area with a better climate or better weather.

 

•Four in ten (41%) would consider moving for a job opportunity.

 

•Over a third (36%) would factor in proximity to family.

 

•One in four (25%) would consider a move for health reasons.

 

•Between one in ten and two in ten would consider a move due to each of the following:

 

- Proximity to friends (18%).

- Proximity to significant other (16%).

- Educational opportunity (14%).

- To live in an area where their lifestyle is more accepted (13%) or where their political views are - more accepted (11%).

- To live in an area where recreational marijuana is legal (11%).

•Seven percent (7%) would consider moving in order to live someplace where their religious views are more accepted.

 

•Meanwhile, 15% would not consider moving to another state for any reason.

Whether the weather...

 

As stated earlier, this list changes greatly depending on a range of factors. Climate consideration, for example, seems to be much more important among those in regions prone to less welcoming weather: •Over six in ten Easterners (64%) and Midwesterners (61%) say they'd consider moving to another state in order to live in an area with a better climate or better weather.

•This drops just below the halfway point among Southerners (48%) and down to 39% among those in the West.

Generations and genders, geographically

 

Looking across the generations, Matures are less likely than their younger counterparts to consider relocating their way into a better climate (54 percent Millennials, 51 percent Gen Xers, 55 percent Baby Boomers, 39 percent Matures). Similarly, Millennials are more likely than any of their elders to say they'd consider moving to live in an area where their lifestyle is more accepted (24 percent, 10 percent, 7 percent and 6 percent).

 

Likelihood to consider moving gets progressively lower as those answering the question get older for: •Job opportunity (68% Millennials, 52% Gen Xers, 20% Baby Boomers and 2% Matures).

 

•Proximity to significant other (24%, 19%, 10% and 4%).

 

•To live in an area where recreational marijuana is legal (20%, 10%, 7% and 1%).

But it may not entirely be the individual factors which are appealing less to older Americans: their roots have likely grown deeper as well, as evidenced by their higher likelihood to say they wouldn't consider moving to another state for any reason (7 percent, 11 percent, 19 percent and 35 percent).

 

Comparing genders, women are more likely than men to say they'd factor in proximity to family (40 percent vs. 31 percent); men, meanwhile, are more likely to say they'd move to live in an area where recreational marijuana is legal (14 percent vs. 8 percent) or where their political views are more accepted (13 percent vs. 9 percent).

 

Looking for like minds

 

While moving in order to live in areas more accepting of their lifestyle, or political or religious views, are not high on the list overall, these motivations clearly resonate more with some Americans than with others. Most notably, LGBT Americans are three times as likely as their non-LGBT counterparts (34 percent vs. 11 percent) to say they'd move in order to live in an area where their lifestyle is more accepted.

 

Where a person stands on the political spectrum also coincides with attitudinal shifts: •Liberals (20%) are more likely than Conservatives (13%) – who in turn are more likely than Moderates (5%) to say they'd consider moving to live someplace where their political views are more accepted.

 

•Conservatives (12%) are more likely than either Moderates (4%) or Liberals (7%) to consider moving to an area where their religious views are more accepted.

 

•Liberals (17%) and Moderates (12%), on the other hand, are more likely than Conservatives (6%) to say they'd consider moving to an area where recreational marijuana is legal.

 

 

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With Respect; 

William Piotrowski

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Comments (2)

Sandra Thomas
Re/Max Achievers - London, OH

Interesting post.  I often times hear people when we have our brutal Ohio cold talk about moving to warmer climates, but few do.  They say they'd miss the change of seasons.

Jan 20, 2016 02:16 AM
Katerina Gasset
Get It Done For Me Virtual Services - Wellington, FL
Get It Done For Me Virtual Services

Hello, William! This is an interesting post. Better weather is a really good selling point for homeowners. Thanks for sharing this!

Jan 20, 2016 02:26 AM