Dock and Boat Safety Tips for Waterfront Properties

By
Real Estate Broker/Owner with American Brokers Realty Group, Inc 3225276

Waterfront properties are residential buildings facing a body of water – it could be a lake, canal, river, or an ocean. They are generally more expensive than other properties and come with a new set of challenges for their owners such as corrosion form salty moist air, and exploited damage through storms, coupled with higher taxes and more regulations imposed on the property. The storms are usually responsible for the greater part of damage when there is any, and it’s essential you know what to do with your dock and boats when a storm hits your waterfront property. Here are some safety tips that can guide you in keeping the dock and boats in your waterfront property in good shape for years to come:

Covering the Boat

Waterfront properties often come along with a dock where you can park your boats. To ensure that the boat is kept well maintained, you would need to keep it covered, under a plastic tarp for instance. This provides ample protection from stormy weather and strong winds.  You could also build a structure to park the boat under using canvas. Aluminum or wood can be used to build an appropriate frame. In Cape Coral, check with the city government if this is an option.

Boat Lift Cables

Stainless steel or galvanized cables are ideal for marine environments.  However, the more they are used, the greater the wear and tear. Check for signs of wear on a regular basis and set up a cleaning schedule.

Mooring Techniques

Securing your boat to any permanent structure is important if you want your boat to stay with you for a long time. Hence it is advisable to always choose the spot well when mooring the boat and keep it secured. Use bolted cleats for more effective docking. Using twin bow lines is advisable as this will keep the boat centered and attached securely with the slip.

Dock and Boat Safety Tips for Waterfront Properties

Waterfront properties are residential buildings facing a body of water – it could be a lake, canal, river, or an ocean. They are generally more expensive than other properties and come with a new set of challenges for their owners such as corrosion form salty moist air, and exploited damage through storms, coupled with higher taxes and more regulations imposed on the property. The storms are usually responsible for the greater part of damage when there is any, and it’s essential you know what to do with your dock and boats when a storm hits your waterfront property. Here are some safety tips that can guide you in keeping the dock and boats in your waterfront property in good shape for years to come:

Covering the Boat

Waterfront properties often come along with a dock where you can park your boats. To ensure that the boat is kept well maintained, you would need to keep it covered, under a plastic tarp for instance. This provides ample protection from stormy weather and strong winds.  You could also build a structure to park the boat under using canvas. Aluminum or wood can be used to build an appropriate frame. In Cape Coral, check with the city government if this is an option.

Boat Lift Cables

Stainless steel or galvanized cables are ideal for marine environments.  However, the more they are used, the greater the wear and tear. Check for signs of wear on a regular basis and set up a cleaning schedule.

Mooring Techniques

Securing your boat to any permanent structure is important if you want your boat to stay with you for a long time. Hence it is advisable to always choose the spot well when mooring the boat and keep it secured. Use bolted cleats for more effective docking. Using twin bow lines is advisable as this will keep the boat centered and attached securely with the slip.

Proper Docking Techniques

Just as landing a plane on a runway is essential to the safety of its passengers and the vehicle itself, similarly, docking your boat also requires skill and expertise. It is a must when docking your boat that you slow down, have a good measure of the tide, and checking the wind beforehand. Stopping a few distances from the dock never hurts you nor your boat.

Inspection for Safety

The US Coast Guard Auxiliary in the region can provide you with a free safety check for your boat.  Plus, upon inspection, they can help you point out areas where improvement is needed so that they can be remedied and safety standards met.

Important Checklist

Make sure you have the following things covered to ensure safe travel and longevity of your vessels:

  •         Check for any engine fuel leakage
  •         Check the VHF radio for connectivity,
  •         Navigation Lights
  •         Fire Extinguishers
  •         Anchor and rode
  •         Vessel papers ( registration, documentation, valid decal and numbers/official number)
  •         Fenders, boat hook and traveling dock lines
  •         Fuel system integrity (check for leaks) and fuel shutoff switch/valves

 

 

us, upon inspection, they can help you point out areas where improvement is needed so that they can be remedied and safety standards met.

Important Checklist

Make sure you have the following things covered to ensure safe travel and longevity of your vessels:

  •         Check for any engine fuel leakage
  •         Check the VHF radio for connectivity,
  •         Navigation Lights
  •         Fire Extinguishers
  •         Anchor and rode
  •         Vessel papers ( registration, documentation, valid decal and numbers/official number)
  •         Fenders, boat hook and traveling dock lines
  •         Fuel system integrity (check for leaks) and fuel shutoff switch/valves

 

 

Comments (1)

Joyce Marsh
Joyce Marsh Real Estate LLC - Daytona Beach, FL
Joyce Marsh Real Estate LLC - Coast & Luxury

This is very good information and safety tips to share for boaters and water enthusiasts. 

Mar 11, 2016 01:59 AM