Attention Non-Horse People Drivers! Use Caution When Driving

By
Real Estate Agent with Cindy Stys Equestrian and Country Properties, Ltd. PA License #AB068077

 

Attention Non-Horse People Drivers!  Use Caution When Driving

 

                                           Use Caution When Driving Around Horse Trailers

 

Those of us that own horses consider them our most valued possessions.  When we take them to various locations for events, trail rides, shows, etc., they travel in the horse trailers.  Now remember, horses are living, breathing creatures weighing about 1,200 pounds or more . . . . . and that is only one horse.  

 

The horse must balance itself on it's four feet while traveling down a winding, somtimes bouncy, road.  That is not an easy task.  Imagine yourself standing in a bus or a train while it is moving, trying to balance yourself.  (I'm sure several of us have done it at one time or another.)  It is not easy.  The same goes for a horse.  

 

While driving a truck and horse trailer, a large distance is required between the rig and the vehicle ahead.  Even though it may seem like a lot of room for several cars to fit, it is not meant for any cars to scoot in front of the rig.  This is actually the amount of distance that is needed to stop safely without having the horse fall.  

 

Avoid tailgating at all costs.  When stopping the rig, the brakes are applied gently.  There  may be times sudden stops will be unavoidable, at which point, any vehicle tailgating and within the blind spot of the horse trailer will end up in the trailer with the horse.  This has happened, sometimes with unfavorable results.

 

Be aware that the truck and horse trailer make wide turns in order to prevent the horse from scrambling.  Lots of room is needed for this as well as time.

 

When the truck and trailer are moving up steep inclines or mountain roads, be patient.  Even with the gas pedal to the floor, the rig will only move so fast.  Remember, that the whole set up with the horses and equipment inside the trailer weigh around 3 tons.  That is a lot of weight to haul, especially up hill.  Patience and space is needed from the other drivers during these times.

 

Another thing to remember is that because a lot of space is needed to move the rigs, allow plenty of space when parking, so as to not park them in.  

 

So, basic rule to remember when driving and you see a horse trailer, assume there are horses in the trailer, allow lots of space between you and the rig and have patience.  This way, all will get to their destinations safely.

Posted by

Brigita McKelvie is a REALTOR®  (Pennsylvania License #RS297130) with Cindy Stys Equestrian & Country Properties, specializing in rural and horse properties and farms in Eastern Pennsylvania.  She has an e-Pro® (Certified Internet Expert) certification and a GRI (Graduate, REALTOR® Institute) designation.  

Brigita McKelvie, REALTOR

Pennsylvania License #RS297130

Rural and Horse Properties and Farms

 

Cindy Stys Equestrian & Country Properties, Ltd.Cindy Stys Equestrian & Country Properties, Ltd.

 

The Premier Equine and Country Real Estate firm serving Eastern Pennsylvania from back yard operations to world class equestrian facilities.

Use a REALTOR with "horse sense" that doesn't horse around when it comes to horse properties.

 

 

e-ProGRI (Graduate, REALTOR Institute)BNI

 

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Rainmaker
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Grant Schneider
Performance Development Strategies - Armonk, NY
Your Coach Helping You Create Successful Outcomes

Hi Brigita - I would certainly be nervous about driving a horse trailer.  You make a good point about people standing in a moving bus.

Sep 12, 2016 04:24 AM #1
Rainmaker
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Brigita McKelvie, Associate Broker
Cindy Stys Equestrian and Country Properties, Ltd. - Lehigh Valley, PA
The Broker with horse sense and no horsing around

Good morning, Grant!

It's not so bad driving a truck and horse trailer.  Basically, you take it slow and easy so the horse has a comfortable ride.  There are too many drivers that are in a hurry these days.  Rushing things only gets you into trouble.  More people should try standing in a moving bus so they understand better what horses have to go through when they travel.

Brigita

Sep 12, 2016 09:58 PM #2
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Rainmaker
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Brigita McKelvie, Associate Broker

The Broker with horse sense and no horsing around
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