A Little Information About RADON

By
Home Inspector with EZ Rider Home Inspections LLC.

Radon

This section is meant to provide a short overview only. Those wishing to know more should follow the EPA link at the bottom of the page. 

What is Radon?

Radon is a colorless, odorless, radioactive gas which is a product of the natural decay of uranium located deep underground.

Lighter than air, it rises through cracks and fissures in the ground and can enter a home through cracks, joints and openings in a concrete slab, or move easily through floor, wall and ceiling framing assemblies. Homes with concrete slab floors, basements and crawlspaces are all vulnerable to radon entry.

Although some radon problems can come from water sources, most are from soil gas.

What Are the Health Risks?

Because it's a radioactive gas, radon will eventually decay. When radon decays it emits tiny radioactive particles. If radon has been inhaled and is inside lungs, these particles can strike lung cells, causing abnormal lung cell replication, otherwise known as cancer.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) calls radon the second leading cause of lung cancer in the U.S.

No "safe" level of radon exists and the effects may be delayed for years, may affect children more than adults, or may never cause health problems. Generally, exposure to higher levels and longer exposure times increase the odds of developing radon-related health problems.

Where is Radon Found?

Some parts of the U.S. are more likely to have elevated levels of radon than others. The EPA National Radon Map provides great information on U.S. radon levels nationwide.

Radon Measurement

The only way to determine whether a home has levels which may pose a health risk it to have the home tested.

A number of testing (radon-measuring) devices are available, ranging from simple do-it-yourself charcoal canisters found at most hardware stores to sophisticated monitors with security features which provide immediate results at end of the typical 48-hour test.

Testing for real estate transactions should comply with EPA protocols and be performed by a qualified neutral third party. Qualifications may vary by state.

Testing requires "closed house conditions," and under certain conditions, opening windows in upper levels of the home make actually increase radon levels in the home due to "stack effect," or the rising of heated air.

Stack effect can pull gas out of the soil.

Test Results

Radon levels are measured and described in picoCuries of radon per liter of air, typically shown as "pCi/L". The EPA action limit is the limit at which the EPA recommends that mitigation take place. At this time (2007) this limit is 4 pCi/L.

What is Mitigation?

The process of lowering radon levels is called "mitigation." Mitigation may involve different approaches or combinations of approaches, depending on the situation and severity of the problem.  Mitigation is often very successful.

For more information, read "A Home Buyer's and Seller's Guide to Radon," an excellent guide by the EPA.

Don Rider

EZ Rider Home Inspections

Bossier Home Inspectors

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Shreveport Bossier Inspections

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Show All Comments
Rainmaker
1,317,757
Joan Whitebook
BHG The Masiello Group - Nashua, NH
Consumer Focused Real Estate Services

Any word on radon in the water limits -- there was a proposal for 4000 pci/l  ??  What is the best way to mitigate radon in the water -- what systems would you suggest.

May 10, 2008 01:42 PM #1
Rainer
15,867
Don Rider
EZ Rider Home Inspections LLC. - Bossier City, LA
Shreveport Bossier Home Inspector

Joan,

you can check out this link Radon in water From the EPA. It may answer your questions.

May 11, 2008 12:33 AM #2
Rainer
146,887
Scott Patterson, ACI
Trace Inspections, LLC - Spring Hill, TN
Home Inspector, Middle TN

Aeration of the water is about the only way to get rid or lower the radon levels in water.

May 11, 2008 07:46 AM #3
Rainer
15,867
Don Rider
EZ Rider Home Inspections LLC. - Bossier City, LA
Shreveport Bossier Home Inspector

Thanks Scott.

May 12, 2008 03:37 AM #4
Rainmaker
92,319
Bob Elliott
Elliott Home Inspection - Chicago, IL
Chicago Property Inspection

Thank you for the information Don.

May 12, 2008 04:34 PM #5
Rainer
15,867
Don Rider
EZ Rider Home Inspections LLC. - Bossier City, LA
Shreveport Bossier Home Inspector

Bob,

You are welcome.

May 13, 2008 02:03 AM #6
Rainer
132,369
Jon Wnoroski
America's 1st Choice RH Realty Co., Inc. - Green, OH
Summit County Realtor

Thanks for the information and link Don.  This is great stuff.

Sep 10, 2008 12:38 AM #7
Rainer
15,867
Don Rider
EZ Rider Home Inspections LLC. - Bossier City, LA
Shreveport Bossier Home Inspector

Jon,

Glad I could help.

Sep 10, 2008 01:37 AM #8
Rainmaker
67,128
Kevin Corsa
H.I.S. Home Inspections (Summit, Stark Counties) - Canton, OH
H.I.S. Home Inspections, Stark & Summit County, OH Home Inspector

Hi Don,

This is a very good post. I was thinking about doing one on radon, but if you would want to make this one available for re-blog, I would be happy to re-post it, since it is so informative.

Let me know, thanks,

Kevin

Sep 15, 2008 11:26 PM #9
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Rainer
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Don Rider

Shreveport Bossier Home Inspector
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