In 2008, Home Loans Are One Day Cheap And The Next Day Expensive

By
Real Estate Agent with Provident Team Real Estate
Through last week, the S&P 500 Index advanced or declined more than 1 percent per day 28 times this year. The represents 52 percent of all trading days and is the most volatile measurement since 1938's 57 percent.
When mortgage rates change rapidly, it's a fiscal challenge to shop for a home and/or home loan. Lately, mortgage rates have been especially volatile, mirroring the wild moves of the stock market. Here's how up-and-down stock markets have been in 2008: Through last week, the S&P 500 Index changed more than 1 percent per day on 28 separate days. This represents 52 percent of all trading days and is the most volatile measurement since 1938. Mortgage financing is impacted by stock market changes because when money flows into stocks, it tends to come from bond markets. And, when money leaves stocks, it tends to "gets parked" in bond markets. Because mortgage bonds set mortgage rates, you can understand how stock market volatility can make it difficult to predict what home loan payments might look like. Volatility is expected to continue for the next several quarters so if you see a mortgage rate you like today, consider locking it right away -- it probably won't last long. Source U.S. Stock Volatility Climbs to Highest in 70 Years, S&P Says Jeff Kearns Bloomberg, March 20, 2008 https://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601213&sid=av840GLwE4UA&refer=home

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