How to Protect Your Plants This Winter

By
Real Estate Broker/Owner with Realty Executives NOLA - Kim Higgins, Broker/Owner - Greater New Orleans & Northshore Area Real Estate

With the colder months settling in, there’s no reason to sacrifice all of your plants. Depending on the type of plants you have and the severity of winter, there are ways to help ensure your favorite decorative greenery sees another spring. Before it’s too late, take the time now to plan your plant protection strategy. These tips selected from gardening experts from around the web should help many of your most beloved shrubs, bushes, trees, and potted wonders make it through the harsh weather. 


Move potted plants off concrete and onto the earth. Protecting the roots of a plant can be key to its survival. The top of a plant can often endure more trauma than the roots. Concrete can warm considerably in the sun, and then become very cold at night. This heat/cool cycle and the rapid swings in temperature it brings can damage roots. 


Plant in big pots. Soil is insulation for root systems. In a 10-gallon pot, you’ll have ten times the protection a 1-gallon pot provides. It can also be useful to buy a pot with a thickness greater than one inch as a means of helping further shield the roots. 


During winter, water at the warmest point in the day. When temperatures climb above freezing, water your plants. Water is often used as a defense against freezing temperatures, in part because when water freezes it releases heat. Also, wet soil does a better job of protecting from invasive cold than dry soil (which contains air pockets). 


Position plants where temperature swings are lower. Often southern exposures will experience the greatest temperature fluctuations, so consider northern or eastern positions around the house. 


Group plants defensively. Gather your plants together, placing the “weakest” of the bunch in the center and the heartiest selection on the outside, forming a border. You can also create a barrier around the group to help shield the plants from excessive wind. 


Mulch for additional insulation. Mulch can help create a blanket of protection. Hay or a thick layer of leaves can also work. 


Consider bringing some plants indoors. Certain potted plants might have the best defense inside. But if you do bring them indoors, bring them in before it gets too cold. The shock of moving from a chilly autumn night to a heated home can be dangerous. 


With a little planning and luck, you can extend the life of your plants and the beauty of your home!

Posted by
Kim Higgins, Broker/Owner
ABR, CRS, e-PRO
Direct Cell: 985-705-1910
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Rainmaker
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Bob Ratliff
Robert Ratliff Realty - San Antonio, TX
"Sold with Bob"

Great tips for homeowners protecting their plants for winter. 

Oct 11, 2018 11:52 AM #1
Rainmaker
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John Pusa
Berkshire Hathaway Home Services Crest - Glendale, CA
Your All Time Realtor With Exceptional Service

Realty Executives NOLA this is very good report about to protect a plants this winter.

Oct 11, 2018 04:36 PM #2
Rainmaker
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Myrl Jeffcoat
GreatWest Realty - Sacramento, CA
Greater Sacramento Real Estate Agent

Those are excellent tips for helping plants survive winter.  I hadn't considered having them sitting on concrete is detrimental to their roots, but can see how that is an issue.

Oct 14, 2018 03:20 PM #3
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