How to Use the Present Perfect Tense

By
Industry Observer with Stylerail

Dealing with grammar rules can be quite tricky. Misused phrases and word forms end up denoting a different message than what has been originally intended, leading to unwanted miscommunication.

Verb tenses such as the use of the present perfect tense, for example, present a challenge to both native and non-native English speakers. To make sure you are using this tense properly, here are some things you need to take note of:

·      Know the syntax

A verb expressed in the present perfect tense contains two elements. The first one depends on the subject of the sentence, that is, whether you will be using has or have (for singular and plural forms of the subject, respectively). The next element deals with adding -d or -ed to the verb’s root word, turning it to its past participle form.

Consider the following phrases as examples that show the present perfect tense:

She has skipped our dance rehearsals.

They have traveled internationally.

·      Understand the context

The present perfect tense can be used to denote two things. First, it can be used to show that an act that has occurred in the past, but at an indefinite or not exact time.

Here’s an example:

My classmates have joined the competition.

The second use of a verb in the present perfect tense is to show that something happened in the past and continues to affect the present.

Like in this sentence:

She has published several scientific papers in the past and is still working on new ones.

 

 

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John Pusa
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Rana Tarakji thanks for the valuable for how to use the present perfect tense.

Sep 10, 2019 02:20 PM #1
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