2021 Massachusetts Migration and Relocation Report

By
Services for Real Estate Pros with ProSource Media

The State of Massachusetts has been steadily growing over the past decade, particularly within the Boston metro region.  Student enrollment numbers have grown at the many Universities that call Boston home, and Boston has become a favorite market for VC funding bringing tens of thousands of jobs to the metro area.  The US Census estimates that Massachusetts’ population has grown 5.26% over the past decade.

 

That growth has has been slowing in recent years, and 2019 marked the first year that the Bay State has lost residents according to estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau.  While we won’t have their 2020 data until November, we do have other reports that indicate that population may have declined even further in 2020. 

 

United Van Lines tracks inbound and outbound moves by State, and the report does not look so bright for Massachusetts.  According to their study, they had the 4th lowest net inbound/outbound shipments out of all 50 states, ahead of Virginia, Ohio, and California and the 3rd lowest inbound shipment percentage at 43%.  So according to their data, there were more people moving out of Massachusetts than moving in.  Seems like a steep margin, but it could easily be explained by the housing supply issues that plagued the City of Boston as a result of remote learning in 2020.

 

How Does Massachusetts Rank In Terms of Inbound & Outbound Migration?

 

So where are all these Mass residents moving to?  According to Census data, New Hampshire, New York and Florida are the top states that residents have moved from.  Here are the top 10 states that Massachusetts residents have relocated to in the past decade:

 

State

# of Outbound Moves

% of Moves

New Hampshire

18723

10.51%

New York

17910

10.06%

Florida

17056

9.58%

California

16158

9.07%

Connecticut

13020

7.31%

Rhode Island

12742

7.15%

Texas

8277

4.65%

Maine

7005

3.93%

Colorado

6053

3.40%

Virginia

5480

3.08%

 

In terms of top states where new Massachusetts residents moved from, you’ll notice a lot of the same States.  New York, New Hampshire and Connecticut top the list of top States where new Mass residents moved from.

State

# of Inbound Moves

% of Moves

New York

17143

11.90%

New Hampshire

11731

8.14%

Connecticut

11690

8.11%

California

11430

7.93%

Florida

10360

7.19%

Rhode Island

7784

5.40%

Maine

6122

4.25%

Texas

6088

4.23%

Pennsylvania

6043

4.19%

New Jersey

5638

3.91%

 

Where Is Population Growing and Shrinking Inside of Massachusetts?

According to the data, the neighborhoods in the Boston Metro are the best places to live in Massachusetts, at least in terms of population growth percentage.  Western Massachusetts is the only area where people have been moving out of over the past decade according to Census estimates.  In fact, out of the 10 cities where population declined the most in the past decade, 8 of them are located in Western Massachusetts.  This could be attributed to cost of living, as home prices have soared in Massachusetts during the population boom.

Town 2010 Population 2019 Population Population Change
North Adams city, Massachusetts 13,764 12,730 -7.51%
Pittsfield city, Massachusetts 44,716 42,142 -5.76%
Barnstable Town city, Massachusetts 45,149 44,477 -1.49%
Easthampton Town city, Massachusetts 16,052 15,829 -1.39%
Greenfield Town city, Massachusetts 17,430 17,258 -0.99%
Northampton city, Massachusetts 28,663 28,451 -0.74%
Chicopee city, Massachusetts 55,306 55,126 -0.33%
Springfield city, Massachusetts 153,569 153,606 0.02%
Westfield city, Massachusetts 41,118 41,204 0.21%
New Bedford city, Massachusetts 95,059 95,363 0.32%

In terms of cities where the population has grown most in the past decade, look no further than Metro Boston.  Cambridge, Chelsea, Watertown, Boston and Everett round out the top 5 in terms of percentage of population growth.   The list of the top 10 clearly show that Metro Boston has been the bigget driver of population growth in the Bay State.

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