Saying "Thank You" - A Sometimes Forgotten Gesture!

By
Real Estate Agent with Prudential Homesale Services Group

At first, when my husband began to grumble about cashiers in our local supermarket forgetting to say "thank you," I dismissed it as the exception to the rule.  Then, when it happened to me repeatedly at the supermarket, department store, pharmacy, and other places of business, I began to see that the practice of showing appreciation to one another in public was dwindling.

The connotation of "thank you" is simple:  "We genuinely appreciate your business and hope that you will return."  More than an issue of politeness and respect, uttering these two beautiful words means that I value you and want you to know it.

Lately, I have encountered a spate of "dead silence" where a nod of appreciation, "thank you", of hand-written "thank you" note should have been.  After volunteering to do a special favor for clients such as pick up a tax report, put their dog outside, or have an extra key to their home made, I do expect a proper "thank you" for the time, energy, cost of gas, etc., that I have used on their behalf.  Similarly, when preparing to show homes to my clients, I also create a personalized packet with the directions, CPML printouts, seller's property disclosures, and any other pertinent information that would be helpful.  Very infrequently does someone say a simple "thank you."  As with any business, they more I do, the more that is expected.

On the other side of the coin, I have been blessed with clients who most definitely appreciate what I do on the behalf, both directly and behind the scenes.  Their attitude and demeanor demonstrate how they feel about my service.  These folks express appreciation in a variety of meaningful ways.  I try to thank them for their patience, vote of confidence, and support.

Returning to my original statement, however, what is happening to protocol in the business world?  In a previous life, I began to experience similar lack of courtesy, too.  For example, writing professional recommendations was a significant component of a position that I held for quite some time. After writing 18 letters of recommendation, I received only three thank-you notes/ e-mails afterward.

Are any of you noticing the trend for co-workers and clients to "forget" to say "thank you?"  Even though we are professionals who are compensated for our performance-based services, being appreciated goes a long way!

 

 

 

                 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Norman L. Annis

108 Round Ridge Road    Mechanicsburg, PA     17055

(717)  766-8857   nannis108@aol.com

 

 

Prea ID#   259735

 

At first, when my husband began to grumble about cashiers in our local supermarket forgetting to say "thank you," I dismissed it as the exception to the rule.  Then, when it happened to me repeatedly at the supermarket, department store, pharmacy, and other places of business, I began to see that the practice of showing appreciation to one another in public was dwindling.

The connotation of "thank you" is simple:  "We genuinely appreciate your business and hope that you will return."  More than an issue of politeness and respect, uttering these two beautiful words means that I value you and want you to know it.

Lately, I have encountered a spate of "dead silence" where a nod of appreciation, "thank you", of hand-written "thank you" note should have been.  After volunteering to do a special favor for clients such as pick up a tax report, put their dog outside, or have an extra key to their home made, I do expect a proper "thank you" for the time, energy, cost of gas, etc., that I have used on their behalf.  Similarly, when preparing to show homes to my clients, I also create a personalized packet with the directions, CPML printouts, seller's property disclosures, and any other pertinent information that would be helpful.  Very infrequently does someone say a simple "thank you."  As with any business, they more I do, the more that is expected.

On the other side of the coin, I have been blessed with clients who most definitely appreciate what I do on the behalf, both directly and behind the scenes.  Their attitude and demeanor demonstrate how they feel about my service.  These folks express appreciation in a variety of meaningful ways.  I try to thank them for their patience, vote of confidence, and support.

Returning to my original statement, however, what is happening to protocol in the business world?  In a previous life, I began to experience similar lack of courtesy, too.  For example, writing professional recommendations was a significant component of a position that I held for quite some time. After writing 18 letters of recommendation, I received only three thank-you notes/ e-mails afterward.

Are any of you noticing the trend for co-workers and clients to "forget" to say "thank you?"  Even though we are professionals who are compensated for our performance-based services, being appreciated goes a long way!

 

 

 

                 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Norman L. Annis

108 Round Ridge Road    Mechanicsburg, PA     17055

(717)  766-8857   nannis108@aol.com

 

 

Prea ID#   259735

 

At first, when my husband began to grumble about cashiers in our local supermarket forgetting to say "thank you," I dismissed it as the exception to the rule.  Then, when it happened to me repeatedly at the supermarket, department store, pharmacy, and other places of business, I began to see that the practice of showing appreciation to one another in public was dwindling.

The connotation of "thank you" is simple:  "We genuinely appreciate your business and hope that you will return."  More than an issue of politeness and respect, uttering these two beautiful words means that I value you and want you to know it.

Lately, I have encountered a spate of "dead silence" where a nod of appreciation, "thank you", of hand-written "thank you" note should have been.  After volunteering to do a special favor for clients such as pick up a tax report, put their dog outside, or have an extra key to their home made, I do expect a proper "thank you" for the time, energy, cost of gas, etc., that I have used on their behalf.  Similarly, when preparing to show homes to my clients, I also create a personalized packet with the directions, CPML printouts, seller's property disclosures, and any other pertinent information that would be helpful.  Very infrequently does someone say a simple "thank you."  As with any business, they more I do, the more that is expected.

On the other side of the coin, I have been blessed with clients who most definitely appreciate what I do on the behalf, both directly and behind the scenes.  Their attitude and demeanor demonstrate how they feel about my service.  These folks express appreciation in a variety of meaningful ways.  I try to thank them for their patience, vote of confidence, and support.

Returning to my original statement, however, what is happening to protocol in the business world?  In a previous life, I began to experience similar lack of courtesy, too.  For example, writing professional recommendations was a significant component of a position that I held for quite some time. After writing 18 letters of recommendation, I received only three thank-you notes/ e-mails afterward.

Are any of you noticing the trend for co-workers and clients to "forget" to say "thank you?"  Even though we are professionals who are compensated for our performance-based services, being appreciated goes a long way!

 

 

 

                 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 At first, when my husband began to grumble about cashiers in our local supermarket forgetting to say "thank you," I dismissed it as the exception to the rule.  Then, when it happened to me repeatedly at the supermarket, department store, pharmacy, and other places of business, I began to see that the practice of showing appreciation to one another in public was dwindling.

The connotation of "thank you" is simple:  "We genuinely appreciate your business and hope that you will return."  More than an issue of politeness and respect, uttering these two beautiful words means that I value you and want you to know it.

Lately, I have encountered a spate of "dead silence" where a nod of appreciation, "thank you", of hand-written "thank you" note should have been.  After volunteering to do a special favor for clients such as pick up a tax report, put their dog outside, or have an extra key to their home made, I do expect a proper "thank you" for the time, energy, cost of gas, etc., that I have used on their behalf.  Similarly, when preparing to show homes to my clients, I also create a personalized packet with the directions, CPML printouts, seller's property disclosures, and any other pertinent information that would be helpful.  Very infrequently does someone say a simple "thank you."  As with any business, they more I do, the more that is expected.

On the other side of the coin, I have been blessed with clients who most definitely appreciate what I do on the behalf, both directly and behind the scenes.  Their attitude and demeanor demonstrate how they feel about my service.  These folks express appreciation in a variety of meaningful ways.  I try to thank them for their patience, vote of confidence, and support.

Returning to my original statement, however, what is happening to protocol in the business world?  In a previous life, I began to experience similar lack of courtesy, too.  For example, writing professional recommendations was a significant component of a position that I held for quite some time. After writing 18 letters of recommendation, I received only three thank-you notes/ e-mails afterward.

Are any of you noticing the trend for co-workers and clients to "forget" to say "thank you?"  Even though we are professionals who are compensated for our performance-based services, being appreciated goes a long way!

 

 

 

                 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by

Roseann

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Rainer
16,199
Ray Henderson
Weichert Realtors' Northeast Group - Saratoga Springs, NY

I have definitely noticed this. I purposely say thank you loudly so they almost have to reply. People need to get back ot the basics!!!

Jun 28, 2008 07:06 AM #1
Rainer
8,558
Andy Park
Weichert Realtors FH Realty - Forest Hills, NY

Absolutely!  I found it interesting that a simple "thank You" is missing in every business in this country.  So many companies swear by their customer service, yet they lack one simple thing " thank you" at the end of a transaction.  fortunately for me, I haven't experienced the lack of "thank you" from my clients yet.

I've been to other countries, and the customer service is where it should be.  I'm sad to say that our system and family values are not where it should be.  Everywhere I go, I thank everyone, even as a customer and you would at least expect the same from customer service, cashiers, etc, nothing!  some actually responde by saying " you're welcome" What???  I'm buying something from you and I have to thank you?  c'mon. 

You brought a very important point that I haven't understood.  I thought it was only in NYC that people and businesses were rude, guess its throughout the entire nation. 

Jun 28, 2008 07:11 AM #2
Rainer
494,722
Lynn911.com ~ Dallas Real Estate Agent Top Team
Dallas Houses for Rent Dallas Apartment Rentals Lynn911.com - Dallas, TX

Actually my daughters 1st words were thank you !, I have received more business for a simple gesture of saying thank you or that nice note that I appreciate all they do. Dallas homes for sale, Call 972-699-9111 Lynn 911 Dallas Top Real Estate Agent, Dallas homes for sale, Dallas home foreclosures for sale, Dallas homes for sale, Dallas foreclosures, Dallas apartments for rent, Dallas apartment rentals, http://www.lynn911.com , http:// dallasapartmentforrent.blogspot.com/

Jun 30, 2008 02:07 AM #3
Rainer
43,118
Roseann Annis
Prudential Homesale Services Group - Camp Hill, PA

Andy, thank you for corroborating my experiences and perceptions about the waning of basic courtesy in the workplace and society, in general.  Subsequent to writing this blog, I am trying to be more conscientious about my "thank yous," too.  It is important for all of us to model appropriate behaviors and to reinforce appreciation whenever it is demonstrated.  In the past, I have "brushed off" compliments and verbal appreciations in an effort to be modest.  Maybe it is time to, instead, say something  like, "It was so nice of you to acknowledge all the effort that I put into finding that information you requested."  Thanks again, Andy!  I'll look for your upcoming blogs.  Roseann

Jul 01, 2008 03:40 AM #4
Rainer
43,118
Roseann Annis
Prudential Homesale Services Group - Camp Hill, PA

Lynn, that's a great comment!  Good manners definitely begin at home!  Thank you.

Rosean

Jul 01, 2008 03:42 AM #5
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