Points: To Pay or Not To Pay

By
Real Estate Agent with Keller Williams Realty

Here is some information to help you decide whether you should or should not pay points on a mortgage.  This has been provided by "Financing Solutions with David Reed".

Numerous closing costs come with any mortgage. There's a fee for an appraisal and a fee for a credit report... and the lender has its fees, too. And don't forget about the attorney fee, title insurance and escrow charges. Closing costs can vary from state to state and province to province, but you really don't have much choice of whether you want a survey or if title insurance is right for you. There will be a variety of services performed and records searched by different companies, and none of these come free of charge.

But there is one closing cost that you can control: discount points or, more simply, points.

A discount point reduces the interest rate on your mortgage. One point is equal to 1 percent of your loan amount, so on a $200,000 loan one point equals $2,000.

Why do some lenders charge points? In reality, all lenders pretty much have the same rates; it's just that sometimes a lender will advertise a rate with a point or a rate without a point. But the decision to pay a point is yours alone.

A point will typically reduce your interest rate by a quarter of a percent on a 30-year mortgage. If your lender offers a 6.5 percent rate with no points, then you may also get 6.25 percent with one point. So how do you decide?

It's simple. Just take the difference in monthly savings gained with the lower rate and divide that into the point. The result equals how many months it will take to "recover" the amount you paid in points. Let's look at an example.

A 30-year fixed-rate mortgage of $200,000 at a 6.5 percent interest rate would mean a monthly principal and interest payment of $1,264.14. By paying an additional $2,000 in the form of a point, your rate would drop to 6.25 percent and the resulting payment would drop to $1,231.43; saving you $32.71 each month. When you divide that $32.71 monthly savings into $2,000 you get 61.14, or about 61 months. Your recovery period is slightly over five years. That's a little long in my opinion and I've never been a big fan of paying points. Instead, I'd encourage you to take that same amount and pay down your principal.

Remember: The quarter percent difference in interest rates when paying a point is an imprecise, general mortgage rule of thumb. Whichever rate you get, be sure to divide the savings into the points paid to see how long it will take to recoup the difference.

If you would like to discuss buying a home, please call me or visit my website.

 

Comments (1)

Highland Beach Condos David Serle
RE/MAX Services - Highland Beach, FL
Boca Raton Agent David Serle

I have noticed that any of the mortgage broker fee's tend to be negotiable, and the title companies some of them are also negotiable.  Points make sense in 2 cases.  One is that you have bad credit or other circumstances that would not allow you to get a regular loan or you plan on staying in the property at least 5 years or longer.  SOmetimes you can just do the math, and show your clients how long it is going to take to make up the points you are going to be charged upfront.

Jul 07, 2008 08:37 AM