First-Time Buyer Tax Credit

By
Real Estate Agent with Prudential Plus Realty

6 Key Facts About the First-Time Buyer Tax Credit

The $7,500 home ownership tax credit that the federal government created earlier this year as part of the Housing and Economic Recovery Act (H.R. 3221) is another tool at your disposal to jump off the fence and get into the real estate market. 

When you combine the tax credit with today's low interest rates, wide selection of for-sale inventory, and affordable home prices, many of the pieces are in place for you to buy now. But tax credits can be confusing. To help you understand how the credit works and why it would help, here are the details. 

1. Buyers have until July 2009 to make a purchase that qualifies. 

The tax credit was passed in July of this year as part of the Housing and Economic Recovery Act (H.R. 3221). It's worth up to $7,500 and can be taken in a single tax year. Authorization for the credit ends July 1, 2009, so if you wait to buy in the first half of 2009 you can take the credit on your 2009 tax return. Taxpayers can take the credit on their 2008 tax return if they bought their house this year after April 9.

2. Buyers don't really have to be "first-timers."

The tax credit is actually available to any individual or household that hasn't owned a home for at least three years. And the NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS® has asked Congress to expand the credit to all buyers, not just those who haven't owned a primary residence in recent years.

3. Even if buyers exceed the income limit, they can benefit from the credit. 

The actual credit amount is set as a percentage of the home purchase amount. That percentage amount is 10 percent, so you can get 10 percent of the home price credited against your tax liability, up to a maximum $7,500. Sounds like a great deal. But what if you make more money than the income limit of $75,000 for individuals and $150,000 for households? Good news: Individuals whose income exceeds the $75,000 limit but don't make more than $95,000 can still take the credit but on a reduced basis. The same thing applies to households earning up to $170,000. By the way, any house is eligible as long as it's a primary residence and is in the United States.

4. Think of it as an interest-free loan.  

The federal government requires the tax credit to be paid back in small, 6.67-percent increments over 15 years, although repayment will be no more than $500 yearly and payments will not start until 2011. For that reason, some analysts have likened the credit to a 15-year, interest-free loan to help make home buying affordable. NAR is pushing congress to remove the repayment provision, making this tax credit a true tax credit rather than an interest-free loan. 

5.  You don't have to be authorized before making a home purchase. 

There is no pre-purchase authorization, application, or other approval process. Eligible buyers simply have to claim the credit on their IRS Form 1040 tax return and/or any form that the IRS might devise. 

6. New-home construction qualifies. 

For a home that a buyer constructs, the purchase date is the first date the buyer occupies the home.However, any home that is not a primary residence, such as a vacation home or income property, does not qualify. 

If you have any additional qestions feel free to call me at 614-523-1000 or 614-212-1026  

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Rainmaker
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Kathy Knight
Intracoastal Realty Corp - Wilmington, NC
BROKER, ABR, CRS, GRI, SFR, SRES

It is a little complicated and buyers need a good realtor to point out all the good stuff about this tax rebate.

Dec 22, 2008 01:32 PM #1
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Dennis Foley

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