Swings n' Roundabouts?

By
Mortgage and Lending with Crescent Bank & Trust

In my opinion, one of the most interesting parts of any job that involves dealing directly with the public is the chance to pick up on figures of speech you may not have heard before.

Yesterday I met with a customer who's proving to be a great referral source, For privacy purposes, we'll call her Kate. Kate grew up in Belfast (Northern), Ireland and continued to live in Belfast until completing her MBA at Belfast University.

Kate's an attractive, energetic, personable, strong-minded, well-educated entrepreneur. She presently runs a Business Coaching service and works with several clients as CFO-for-hire. In the 22 years since emigrating (or is it immi-?) from Ireland to the US, Kate has diligently practiced speaking the King's English in such a way that none of her Irish brogue is noticeable in general conversation.

Yesterday I called on Kate hoping for a tour of her new office. During the visit she brought me up to date on the status of a negotiation for the purchase of commercial real estate in which she's representing a mutual customer as business advisor. At the close of the conversation, Kate said, "So, we're at swings 'n' roundabouts."  Not wanting to appear ignorant, but out of utter confusion, I asked, "Is that like saying "Six of one, half-dozen of the other"?  "No, silly", she replied. "It's. . . "

Challenge to AR members: Please respond to this post with the answer to what the phrase "We're at swings n' roundabouts" means!

Posted by

North Metro Atlanta community banker, Woodstock, GA

Comments (4)

Lori Isaacson
Credit Restoration Consultants - Plantation, FL

We are going around in circles?????

That is my guess!!

Happy Thursday!!

Lori

Feb 12, 2009 04:59 AM
Troy Batson
The Lowes Group - Bend, OR
Bend Oregon Real Estate

I believe it means there are as many advantages to the situation as there are problems.

Feb 12, 2009 05:23 AM
Dean Curtis
Coldwell Banker Kittitas Valley Realty - Ellensburg, WA

Clark - Sounds like it has come to blows, an impasse, or loggerheads. Sounds like she is fun to be around. Dean

Feb 12, 2009 05:36 AM
Clark Blackwell
Crescent Bank & Trust - Woodstock, GA

Lori, Troy, & Dean- Congratulations. You're all close enough to the true meaning that it wouldn't have sidetracked the negotiation whether you asked for an explanation or not!

Troy probably guessed the closest. The analogy is trying to get to a destination but getting sidetracked on a child's playground. Whether we play on the swingset or on the roundabout (merry-go-round / spinning jenny), we're all still on the playground & getting nowhere.

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Like Dean, I was thinking fighting (boxing) since both sound like punches / blows. 

Your advice: Did my offer to give the real definition 24 hours later come across as flippant?

Feb 13, 2009 05:17 AM